Next Article in Journal
Risks, Information and Short-Run Timber Supply
Next Article in Special Issue
Individual-Based Allometric Equations Accurately Measure Carbon Storage and Sequestration in Shrublands
Previous Article in Journal
Use of Forest Residues for Building Forest Biomass Supply Chains: Technical and Economic Analysis of the Production Process
Previous Article in Special Issue
Potential for Climate Change Mitigation in Degraded Forests: A Study from La Primavera, México
Open AccessArticle

White Spruce Plantations on Abandoned Agricultural Land: Are They More Effective as C Sinks than Natural Succession?

Ministère des Ressources naturelles, Direction de la recherche forestière, 2700 Einstein St., Québec, QC G1P 3W8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2013, 4(4), 1141-1157; https://doi.org/10.3390/f4041141
Received: 16 October 2013 / Revised: 21 November 2013 / Accepted: 3 December 2013 / Published: 11 December 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest and Wood Vegetation Carbon Stores and Sequestration)
The objective of this study was to compare organic carbon (C) accumulation in plantations (PL) and natural succession (NS) established on fallow lands along a 50-year chronosequence in the eastern mixed forest subzone of Quebec (Canada). Above- and below-ground woody biomass were estimated from vegetation measurement surveys, and litter and soil (0–50 cm depth) C from samplings. At the year of abandonment, total C content of both PL and NS sites averaged 100 ± 13 Mg C ha−1. Over 50 years, total C content doubled on NS sites and tripled on PL sites (217.9 ± 28.7 vs. 285.7 ± 31.0 Mg ha−1) with respect to fallow land. On NS sites, the new C stocks accumulated entirely in the vegetation. On PL sites, C accumulated mostly in the vegetation and to a lesser extent in the litter, whereas it decreased by a third in the soil. As a result, the net C accumulation rate was 1.7 ± 0.7 Mg ha−1 yr−1 greater on PL sites than on NS sites over 50 years. By the 23rd year, PL sites became greater net C sinks than NS sites in the fallow lands of the study area, even with the loss of soil C. View Full-Text
Keywords: forest carbon sequestration; afforestation; white spruce; plantations; natural succession; abandoned agricultural land forest carbon sequestration; afforestation; white spruce; plantations; natural succession; abandoned agricultural land
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tremblay, S.; Ouimet, R. White Spruce Plantations on Abandoned Agricultural Land: Are They More Effective as C Sinks than Natural Succession? Forests 2013, 4, 1141-1157.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop