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Article

Evaluation of Soda Lignin from Wheat Straw/Sarkanda Grass as a Potential Future Consolidant for Archaeological Wood

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Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo, PB 6762 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 13, 56124 Pisa, Italy
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National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (NCMH), School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington LE12 5RD, UK
4
Wageningen Food & Biobased Research, Bornse Weilanden 9, 6708WG Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Magdalena Broda and Callum A. S. Hill
Forests 2021, 12(7), 911; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070911
Received: 6 June 2021 / Revised: 9 July 2021 / Accepted: 9 July 2021 / Published: 13 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Historical Wood: Structure, Properties and Conservation)
This work is part of a larger study, which aims to use soda lignin from straw as the starting point for a non-aqueous consolidant for highly degraded archaeological wood from the Oseberg collection. This wood was treated with alum salts in the early 1900s, is actively degrading and exists in varying states of preservation. Non-aqueous consolidants are an option to stabilize this wood mechanically in cases where it is too deteriorated to undergo aqueous-based retreatments, for example using polyethylene glycol. The aim of this study was to compare the extent of penetration of two soda lignin preparations in low- to medium-degraded archaeological pine. The soda lignins were dissolved in ethyl acetate and had two molecular weight groups: P1000 (molecular weight Mw of~3 kDa) and the ethyl acetate fraction FB01 (Mw of ~1 kDa). Penetration after immersion was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy and analytical pyrolysis. Treated specimens were also evaluated using weight and dimensional change and scanning electron microscopy. Both lignins penetrated into sample cores, but P1000 did not penetrate as well as FB01. This may be due to differences in their molecular weights, but also differences in polarity due to the presence of different functional groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: soda lignin; penetration; archaeological wood; infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR); pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS); scanning electron microscopy (SEM) soda lignin; penetration; archaeological wood; infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR); pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS); scanning electron microscopy (SEM)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Łucejko, J.J.; de Lamotte, A.; Andriulo, F.; Kutzke, H.; Harding, S.; Phillips-Jones, M.; Modugno, F.; Slaghek, T.M.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Braovac, S. Evaluation of Soda Lignin from Wheat Straw/Sarkanda Grass as a Potential Future Consolidant for Archaeological Wood. Forests 2021, 12, 911. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070911

AMA Style

Łucejko JJ, de Lamotte A, Andriulo F, Kutzke H, Harding S, Phillips-Jones M, Modugno F, Slaghek TM, Gosselink RJA, Braovac S. Evaluation of Soda Lignin from Wheat Straw/Sarkanda Grass as a Potential Future Consolidant for Archaeological Wood. Forests. 2021; 12(7):911. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070911

Chicago/Turabian Style

Łucejko, Jeannette J., Anne de Lamotte, Fabrizio Andriulo, Hartmut Kutzke, Stephen Harding, Mary Phillips-Jones, Francesca Modugno, Ted M. Slaghek, Richard J. A. Gosselink, and Susan Braovac. 2021. "Evaluation of Soda Lignin from Wheat Straw/Sarkanda Grass as a Potential Future Consolidant for Archaeological Wood" Forests 12, no. 7: 911. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070911

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