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Article

Cable Tensile Forces Associated to Winch Design in Tethered Harvesting Operations: A Case Study from the Pacific North West

1
Department of Forest Resources Management, Faculty of Forestry, The University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
2
Department of Forest Engineering Resources and Management, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, 311 Snell Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
3
Department of Land Environment Agriculture and Forestry, Università degli Studi di Padova, Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, PD, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gianni Picchi
Forests 2021, 12(7), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070827
Received: 27 May 2021 / Revised: 17 June 2021 / Accepted: 18 June 2021 / Published: 23 June 2021
Cable tensile forces in winch-assist harvesting have been investigated in order to assess the safety concerns of the technology. However, the literature is lacking, particularly in regards to the impact of winch design. In this study, a Summit Winch Assist tethering a feller-director on ground slopes up to 77% was monitored for four days. The cable tensile forces were simultaneously recorded at the harvesting and anchor machine at a frequency of 100 Hz. Cameras and GNSS devices enabled a time study of the operations and the recording of machine positions. Winch functionality and design were disclosed by the manufacturer and used for the interpretation of the results. The cable tensile forces reached 296 kN at the harvesting machine and 260 kN at the anchor machine. The slow negotiation of obstacles while moving downhill recorded the highest peaks, mainly due to threshold settings of the winch in the brake system activation. Lower but significant peaks were also recorded during stationary work tasks. The peaks, however, were limited to a few events and never exceeded the endurance limit of the cable. Overall, the study confirmed recent findings in cable tensile force analysis of active winch-assist operations and provided evidence of the underlaying mechanisms that contribute to cable tensile forces. View Full-Text
Keywords: forestry; harvesting; forest operations; winch-assist; wire rope; tension; safety forestry; harvesting; forest operations; winch-assist; wire rope; tension; safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mologni, O.; Nance, E.D.T.; Lyons, C.K.; Marchi, L.; Grigolato, S.; Cavalli, R.; Roeser, D. Cable Tensile Forces Associated to Winch Design in Tethered Harvesting Operations: A Case Study from the Pacific North West. Forests 2021, 12, 827. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070827

AMA Style

Mologni O, Nance EDT, Lyons CK, Marchi L, Grigolato S, Cavalli R, Roeser D. Cable Tensile Forces Associated to Winch Design in Tethered Harvesting Operations: A Case Study from the Pacific North West. Forests. 2021; 12(7):827. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070827

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mologni, Omar, Eric D.T. Nance, C. K. Lyons, Luca Marchi, Stefano Grigolato, Raffaele Cavalli, and Dominik Roeser. 2021. "Cable Tensile Forces Associated to Winch Design in Tethered Harvesting Operations: A Case Study from the Pacific North West" Forests 12, no. 7: 827. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070827

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