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Article

Achieving Robust and Socially Acceptable Environmental Policy Recommendations: Lessons from Combining the Choice Experiment Method and Institutional Analysis Focused on Cultural Ecosystem Services

Institute for Economic and Environmental Policy, Faculty of Social and Economic Studies, Jan Evangelista Purkyně University, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem, Czech Republic
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Academic Editor: Bernd Hansjürgens
Forests 2021, 12(4), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040484
Received: 18 March 2021 / Revised: 7 April 2021 / Accepted: 12 April 2021 / Published: 14 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Economics of Forest Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity)
The reflection of ecosystem services in environmental policy has recently become a key aspect in solving environmental problems occurring as a consequence of their overburdening. However, decision makers often pay attention predominantly to results of quantitative (monetary valuation) methods. This article explores a new way of combining quantitative and qualitative methods that has proven to be a useful practice for achieving better environmental governance. We combine the (quantitative) choice experiment method and (qualitative) institutional analysis as full and equal complements. In our approach, the goal of qualitative institutional analysis is not to verify the adequacy of willingness-to-pay results but rather to better address cultural and social perspectives of society representatives. Such an approach increases the robustness of policy recommendations and their acceptance in comparison with isolated applications of both methods. To verify this general premise, both methods were applied in the territory of the Eastern Ore Mountains in the Czech Republic to capture preferences and attitudes of local stakeholders as well as tourists towards small-scale ecosystems. The results confirm that preference calculations regarding aesthetic values of ecosystems need to be complemented with facts about institutional settings and barriers in order to better address locally relevant recommendations for decision makers, such as the introduction of new economic instruments (e.g., local taxes or entrance fees). The findings of this study can also be considered for governance of larger local, common-pool resources such as (public) forests or protected areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: choice experiment; ecosystem services; institutional analysis; environmental governance; mixed-method research; small-scale ecosystems choice experiment; ecosystem services; institutional analysis; environmental governance; mixed-method research; small-scale ecosystems
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MDPI and ACS Style

Louda, J.; Vojáček, O.; Slavíková, L. Achieving Robust and Socially Acceptable Environmental Policy Recommendations: Lessons from Combining the Choice Experiment Method and Institutional Analysis Focused on Cultural Ecosystem Services. Forests 2021, 12, 484. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040484

AMA Style

Louda J, Vojáček O, Slavíková L. Achieving Robust and Socially Acceptable Environmental Policy Recommendations: Lessons from Combining the Choice Experiment Method and Institutional Analysis Focused on Cultural Ecosystem Services. Forests. 2021; 12(4):484. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040484

Chicago/Turabian Style

Louda, Jiří, Ondřej Vojáček, and Lenka Slavíková. 2021. "Achieving Robust and Socially Acceptable Environmental Policy Recommendations: Lessons from Combining the Choice Experiment Method and Institutional Analysis Focused on Cultural Ecosystem Services" Forests 12, no. 4: 484. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040484

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