Next Article in Journal
Drivers of Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Community Structure Associated with Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica Differ at Regional vs. Local Spatial Scales in Northern China
Next Article in Special Issue
Micro-Hotspots for Conservation: An Umbrella Tree Species for the Unique Socotran Reptile Fauna
Previous Article in Journal
Male and Female Plants of Salix viminalis Perform Similarly to Flooding in Morphology, Anatomy, and Physiology
Previous Article in Special Issue
Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence and Phylogenetic Inference of the Canary Islands Dragon Tree (Dracaena draco L.)
Open AccessArticle

The Conservation Status and Population Mapping of the Endangered Dracaena serrulata in the Dhofar Mountains, Oman

1
Department of Forest Management and Applied Geoinformatics, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Department of Forest Botany, Dendrology and Geobiocoenology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Anthropology Department, University College London, London WC1H 0BW, UK
4
Botany and Conservation Department, Oman Botanic Garden, Diwan of Royal Court, P.O. Box 808, Muscat 122, Oman
5
International Union for Conservation of Nature, The David Attenborough Building, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(3), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030322
Received: 20 January 2020 / Revised: 8 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 14 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dragon Trees - Tertiary Relicts in Current Reality)
Populations of Dracaena serrulata are disappearing at an alarming rate in the Arabian Peninsula. They are being destroyed by herders who use the leaves as fodder for camels, goats, and sheep during the dry season. Up until now, precise information about the current distribution and population status of D. serrulata in Oman have not been published. To fill this gap, the main aim of this work was to map the species distribution in the Dhofar Mountains (Oman) and to define the conservation and health status of the populations. Three isolated sub-populations of the study species were defined and mapped: the Jabal Samhan, Jabal al Qara, and Jabal al Qamar sub-populations. Dracaena serrulata occupies an area of 227 km2 in the Dhofar Mountains. More than 43,000 trees were counted, and 2387 trees were inventoried in total. The Jabal Samhan sub-population is an example of an extensively damaged population with 59% of the trees recorded as dead and only 21% healthy trees. Populationsin the western portions of the Dhofar Mountains., Jabal al Qamar, and Jabal al Qara are comparatively abundant stands of healthy trees with a higher proportion of seedlings. The health of trees is strongly influenced by accessibility and precipitation provided by the southwest summer monsoon: the healthy individuals predominate on the steep terrain along the seaward facing cliffs. View Full-Text
Keywords: Dracaena serrulata; Dhofar Mountains; health status; Oman; occurrence; threat Dracaena serrulata; Dhofar Mountains; health status; Oman; occurrence; threat
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vahalík, P.; Patočka, Z.; Drápela, K.; Habrová, H.; Ehrenbergerová, L.; Lengálová, K.; Kalivodová, H.; Pompeiano Vaníčková, L.; Al-Shamahi, E.; Lupton, D.; Al Issai, G.; Al Hinai, A.; Al Hatmi, S.; Starnes, T.; Maděra, P. The Conservation Status and Population Mapping of the Endangered Dracaena serrulata in the Dhofar Mountains, Oman. Forests 2020, 11, 322.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop