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Open AccessReview

Why Does Phlebiopsis gigantea not Always Inhibit Root and Butt Rot in Conifers?

1
Department of Forest Protection, Forest Research Institute in Sękocin Stary, Braci Leśnej 3, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
2
Department of Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warsaw, Poland
3
Department of Entomology, Phytopathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Faculty of Environmental Management and Agriculture, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Prawocheńskiego 17, 10-721 Olsztyn, Poland
4
Department of Forestry and Forest Ecology, Faculty of Environmental Management and Agriculture, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Pl. Łódzki 2, 10-727 Olsztyn, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(2), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020129
Received: 28 November 2019 / Revised: 6 January 2020 / Accepted: 19 January 2020 / Published: 21 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological and Bio-Based Management of Forest Pests and Pathogens)
This review aims to identify possible causes of differing effectiveness of artificial biological control of Heterobasidion root rot by the saprotrophic fungus Phlebiopsis gigantea. We describe published information in terms of pathogen–competitor relationships and the impact of environmental and genetic factors. We also revisit data from original research performed in recent years at the Forest Research Institute in Poland. We hypothesized that, in many cases, competition in roots and stumps of coniferous trees between the necrotrophic Heterobasidion spp. and the introduced saprotroph, Phlebiopsis gigantea, is affected by growth characteristics and enzymatic activity of the fungi, the characteristics of the wood, and environmental conditions. We concluded that both wood traits and fungal enzymatic activity during wood decay in roots and stumps, and the richness of the fungal biota, may limit biological control of root rot. In addition, we identify the need for research on new formulations and isolates of the fungal competitor, Phlebiopsis gigantea, as well as on approaches for accurately identifying the infectious threat from pathogens. View Full-Text
Keywords: competition; Heterobasidion annosum; Heterobasidion parviporum; mycelium growth; wood decay competition; Heterobasidion annosum; Heterobasidion parviporum; mycelium growth; wood decay
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Żółciak, A.; Sikora, K.; Wrzosek, M.; Damszel, M.; Sierota, Z. Why Does Phlebiopsis gigantea not Always Inhibit Root and Butt Rot in Conifers? Forests 2020, 11, 129.

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