Next Article in Journal
Potential Distribution Shifts of Plant Species under Climate Change in Changbai Mountains, China
Previous Article in Journal
Press-Pulse Odocoileus Virginianus Herbivory in Relict Tsuga Canadensis Stands in the Western Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA
Open AccessArticle

The Impacts of Vegetation Types and Soil Properties on Soil Microbial Activity and Metabolic Diversity in Subtropical Forests

1
Jianshui Research Station, School of Soil and Water Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, No. 35 Qinghua East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China
2
Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration on Soil and Water Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, No. 35 Qinghua East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China
3
Institute of Desertification Studies, Chinese Academy of Forestry, No. 1 Dong Xiao Fu, Xiangshan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100091, China
4
Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Key Laboratory of Karst Dynamics, Ministry of Land and Resources and Science and Technology Department of Guangxi, Guilin 541004, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(6), 497; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10060497
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 7 June 2019 / Accepted: 8 June 2019 / Published: 11 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
Microbial functional diversity is significantly associated with both nutrient cycling and organic matter decomposition. However, how different forests as well as the soil parent materials influence the soil microbial carbon metabolism remains poorly understood. In this study, a natural secondary forest and a Pinus yunnanensis plantation, with similar climatic conditions under contrasting parent materials (clasolite in the non-karst areas and limestone in the karst areas) in Yunnan Province, China, were investigated. The soil microbial carbon metabolism diversity was assessed by the Biolog® ECO-plates. During the dry season, the soil microbial communities used carbon substrate in secondary forest and Pinus yunnanensis plantation, showing no significant difference, both in non-karst and karst areas. The microbial communities in the non-karst area were more efficient in utilizing carbon substrates than those in the karst area with the same vegetation types, resulting in the higher accumulation of organic carbon in the karst area. The six categories of most frequently utilized carbon substrates were carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids in both the non-karst and the karst areas. The soil basal respiration of the secondary forest was higher than that of the Pinus yunnanensis plantation, both in the non-karst and the karst areas. In addition, the driving factors of the soil microbial community functional diversity in the non-karst and karst areas are different. Our findings suggest that soil microbial functional diversity is governed by vegetation types as well as by soil properties in subtropical forests. Moreover, calcareous soil holds a higher proportion of recalcitrant organic carbon, which is difficult to utilize by microorganisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetation types; secondary forest; Pinus yunnanensis plantation; subtropical forests; microbial functional diversity; carbon substrate vegetation types; secondary forest; Pinus yunnanensis plantation; subtropical forests; microbial functional diversity; carbon substrate
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pang, D.; Wang, G.; Liu, Y.; Cao, J.; Wan, L.; Wu, X.; Zhou, J. The Impacts of Vegetation Types and Soil Properties on Soil Microbial Activity and Metabolic Diversity in Subtropical Forests. Forests 2019, 10, 497.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop