Next Article in Journal
Tissue Response to, and Degradation Rate of, Photocrosslinked Trimethylene Carbonate-Based Elastomers Following Intramuscular Implantation
Next Article in Special Issue
Freeze-Casting of Porous Biomaterials: Structure, Properties and Opportunities
Previous Article in Journal
Chemoselectivity in the Dehydrocoupling Synthesis of Higher Molecular Weight Polysilanes
Previous Article in Special Issue
Performance of Zirconia for Dental Healthcare
Open AccessReview

Bone Substitute Fabrication Based on Dissolution-Precipitation Reactions

Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 Japan
Materials 2010, 3(2), 1138-1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma3021138
Received: 7 December 2009 / Revised: 29 January 2010 / Accepted: 9 February 2010 / Published: 10 February 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramics for Healthcare)
Although block- or granular-type sintered hydroxyapatite are known to show excellent tissue responses and good osteoconductivity, apatite powder elicits inflammatory response. For the fabrication of hydroxyapatite block or granules, sintering is commonly employed. However, the inorganic component of bone and tooth is not high crystalline hydroxyapatite but low crystalline B-type carbonate apatite. Unfortunately, carbonate apatite powder cannot be sintered due to its instability at high temperature. Another method to fabricate apatite block and/or granule is through phase transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions using a precursor phase. This reaction basically is the same as a setting and hardening reaction of calcium sulfate or plaster. In this paper, apatite block fabrication methods by phase transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions will be discussed, with a focus on the similarity of the setting and hardening reaction of calcium sulfate. View Full-Text
Keywords: apatite; phase transformation; dissolution-precipitation; carbonate apatite; low-crystallinity; precursor apatite; phase transformation; dissolution-precipitation; carbonate apatite; low-crystallinity; precursor
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ishikawa, K. Bone Substitute Fabrication Based on Dissolution-Precipitation Reactions. Materials 2010, 3, 1138-1155.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Back to TopTop