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Review

Nanosensors for Visual Detection of Glucose in Biofluids: Are We Ready for Instrument-Free Home-Testing?

1
Nanobiointeractions and Nanodiagnostics, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova, Italy
2
Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Fathi Moussa
Materials 2021, 14(8), 1978; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14081978
Received: 8 March 2021 / Revised: 29 March 2021 / Accepted: 13 April 2021 / Published: 15 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications)
Making frequent large-scale screenings for several diseases economically affordable would represent a real breakthrough in healthcare. One of the most promising routes to pursue such an objective is developing rapid, non-invasive, and cost-effective home-testing devices. As a first step toward a diagnostic revolution, glycemia self-monitoring represents a solid base to start exploring new diagnostic strategies. Glucose self-monitoring is improving people’s life quality in recent years; however, current approaches still present vast room for improvement. In most cases, they still involve invasive sampling processes (i.e., finger-prick), quite discomforting for frequent measurements, or implantable devices which are costly and commonly dedicated to selected chronic patients, thus precluding large-scale monitoring. Thanks to their unique physicochemical properties, nanoparticles hold great promises for the development of rapid colorimetric devices. Here, we overview and analyze the main instrument-free nanosensing strategies reported so far for glucose detection, highlighting their advantages/disadvantages in view of their implementation as cost-effective rapid home-testing devices, including the potential use of alternative non-invasive biofluids as samples sources. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanosensors; glucose; colorimetric test; instrument-free; POC; home testing nanosensors; glucose; colorimetric test; instrument-free; POC; home testing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Boselli, L.; Pomili, T.; Donati, P.; Pompa, P.P. Nanosensors for Visual Detection of Glucose in Biofluids: Are We Ready for Instrument-Free Home-Testing? Materials 2021, 14, 1978. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14081978

AMA Style

Boselli L, Pomili T, Donati P, Pompa PP. Nanosensors for Visual Detection of Glucose in Biofluids: Are We Ready for Instrument-Free Home-Testing? Materials. 2021; 14(8):1978. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14081978

Chicago/Turabian Style

Boselli, Luca, Tania Pomili, Paolo Donati, and Pier P. Pompa 2021. "Nanosensors for Visual Detection of Glucose in Biofluids: Are We Ready for Instrument-Free Home-Testing?" Materials 14, no. 8: 1978. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14081978

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