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The Bad and the Good—Microorganisms in Cultural Heritage Environments—An Update on Biodeterioration and Biotreatment Approaches

Department of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, Institute of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa 1, 02-096 Warsaw, Poland
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Materials 2021, 14(1), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14010177
Received: 3 December 2020 / Revised: 27 December 2020 / Accepted: 29 December 2020 / Published: 1 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradation or Biodeterioration of Non-metallic Materials)
Cultural heritage objects constitute a very diverse environment, inhabited by various bacteria and fungi. The impact of these microorganisms on the degradation of artworks is undeniable, but at the same time, some of them may be applied for the efficient biotreatment of cultural heritage assets. Interventions with microorganisms have been proven to be useful in restoration of artworks, when classical chemical and mechanical methods fail or produce poor or short-term effects. The path to understanding the impact of microbes on historical objects relies mostly on multidisciplinary approaches, combining novel meta-omic technologies with classical cultivation experiments, and physico-chemical characterization of artworks. In particular, the development of metabolomic- and metatranscriptomic-based analyses associated with metagenomic studies may significantly increase our understanding of the microbial processes occurring on different materials and under various environmental conditions. Moreover, the progress in environmental microbiology and biotechnology may enable more effective application of microorganisms in the biotreatment of historical objects, creating an alternative to highly invasive chemical and mechanical methods. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacteria; fungi; biodeterioration; biotreatment; meta-omics; cultural heritage bacteria; fungi; biodeterioration; biotreatment; meta-omics; cultural heritage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pyzik, A.; Ciuchcinski, K.; Dziurzynski, M.; Dziewit, L. The Bad and the Good—Microorganisms in Cultural Heritage Environments—An Update on Biodeterioration and Biotreatment Approaches. Materials 2021, 14, 177. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14010177

AMA Style

Pyzik A, Ciuchcinski K, Dziurzynski M, Dziewit L. The Bad and the Good—Microorganisms in Cultural Heritage Environments—An Update on Biodeterioration and Biotreatment Approaches. Materials. 2021; 14(1):177. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14010177

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pyzik, Adam, Karol Ciuchcinski, Mikolaj Dziurzynski, and Lukasz Dziewit. 2021. "The Bad and the Good—Microorganisms in Cultural Heritage Environments—An Update on Biodeterioration and Biotreatment Approaches" Materials 14, no. 1: 177. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14010177

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