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Article

Increasing Necking Strain through Corrugation: Identifying Composite Systems That Can Benefit from Corrugated Geometry

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
3
Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS, Université de Lorraine, Arts et Métier Paris Tech, F 57000 Metz, France
4
LABoratoire d’EXcellence DAMAS, Université de Lorraine, F 57000 Metz, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(22), 5175; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13225175
Received: 13 October 2020 / Revised: 2 November 2020 / Accepted: 12 November 2020 / Published: 17 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Advanced Composites)
Under some circumstances, composites with a corrugated reinforcement geometry show larger necking strains compared to traditional straight reinforced composites. In this work, finite element modeling studies were performed for linearly hardening materials, examining the effect of material parameters on the stress–strain response of both corrugation and straight-reinforced composites. These studies showed that improvements in necking strain depend on the ability of the corrugation to unbend and to provide a boost in work hardening at the right time. It was found that there is a range of matrix yield strengths and hardening rates for which a corrugated geometry will improve the necking strain and also a lower threshold of reinforcement yield strength below which no improvement in necking strain is possible. In addition, benefit maps and surfaces were generated that show which regions of property space benefit through corrugation and the corresponding improvement in necking strain that can be achieved. View Full-Text
Keywords: composite materials; architectured materials; corrugated reinforcements; finite element modeling (FEM); mechanical properties composite materials; architectured materials; corrugated reinforcements; finite element modeling (FEM); mechanical properties
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fraser, M.; Zurob, H.; Wu, P.; Bouaziz, O. Increasing Necking Strain through Corrugation: Identifying Composite Systems That Can Benefit from Corrugated Geometry. Materials 2020, 13, 5175. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13225175

AMA Style

Fraser M, Zurob H, Wu P, Bouaziz O. Increasing Necking Strain through Corrugation: Identifying Composite Systems That Can Benefit from Corrugated Geometry. Materials. 2020; 13(22):5175. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13225175

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fraser, Mark; Zurob, Hatem; Wu, Peidong; Bouaziz, Olivier. 2020. "Increasing Necking Strain through Corrugation: Identifying Composite Systems That Can Benefit from Corrugated Geometry" Materials 13, no. 22: 5175. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13225175

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