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Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG and Diode Laser Applications on Dental Implant Surfaces Contaminated with Acinetobacter Baumannii and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

1
Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam 31441, Saudi Arabia
2
Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam 31441, Saudi Arabia
3
Dental Services, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2073; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132073
Received: 11 May 2019 / Revised: 20 June 2019 / Accepted: 25 June 2019 / Published: 27 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials and Techniques for Dental Implant Treatment)
Treatment of peri-implantitis through several implant surface decontamination techniques have been reported, however, some of them can negatively alter the implant surface or enhance more bacterial resistance. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate implant surface decontamination by means of Er,Cr:YSGG and diode lasers. Fifty micro-textured (MTX) dental implants were contaminated with Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 25) and with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 25). All implants were then divided into five groups for the decontamination procedure. In group I (GI), decontamination was done with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm), while in group II (GII) decontamination was performed using photodynamic therapy (a 650 nm diode laser). In Group III (GIII) decontamination was performed with photodynamic therapy (an 808 nm diode laser), and in group IV (GIV) decontamination was performed with 0.12% chlorhexidine. Group V (GV) was the control group with no decontamination. After decontamination, colony forming units (CFU) were counted and implants were prepared for SEM analysis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed for GI compared to the other groups, and also for GIV compared to both GII and GIII. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser (GI) showed the best results in decontaminating the implant surface. Chlorhexidine (GIV), proved to be better in decontaminating the implant surface than photodynamic therapy GII and diode laser GIII. No significant difference was found between group GII and GIII. The SEM analysis showed no significant change in the implant surface topography. The results of this study suggest that the Er,Cr:YSGG laser can be considered as an effective technique for reducing bacteria contamination on implant surfaces. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental implant; Er,Cr:YSGG; Acinetobacter baumannii; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; diode laser dental implant; Er,Cr:YSGG; Acinetobacter baumannii; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; diode laser
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Alagl, A.S.; Madi, M.; Bedi, S.; Al Onaizan, F.; Al-Aql, Z.S. The Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG and Diode Laser Applications on Dental Implant Surfaces Contaminated with Acinetobacter Baumannii and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. Materials 2019, 12, 2073.

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