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Feasibility and Characterization Mortar Blended with High-Amount Basic Oxygen Furnace Slag

1
Department of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Shennong Rd., I-Lan 260, Taiwan
2
ARDEX Taiwan Inc., 10F.-2, No. 120, Qiaohe Rd., Zhonghe Dist., New Taipei City 235, Taiwan
3
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jun Gong Road, Shanghai 200093, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2019, 12(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010006
Received: 22 September 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from IMETI2018)
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PDF [5795 KB, uploaded 20 December 2018]
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Abstract

Basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) was ground to three levels of fineness as a replacement for cement at weight proportions of 10, 30, 50, and 70 wt.%. Fineness and weight proportion were shown to have significant effects on the flowability and setting time of the mortars. The expansion of BOFS mortars increased with an increase in the proportion of cement replaced, thereby exacerbating the effects of cracking. Optimal mechanical properties were achieved when 10 wt.% of the cement was replaced using BOFS with fineness of 10,000 cm2/g. The compressive strength of BOFS mortar is similar to that of ordinary Portland mortar, which makes BOFS suitable for the partial replacement of cement as a supplementary cementitious material. Scanning electron microscopy results revealed that the reaction of CaO with H2O results in the formation of C–S–H colloids, whereas the reaction of SiO2 with Al2O3 produces C–A–S–H colloids. The use of BOFS as a partial replacement for Portland cement could make a tremendous contribution to the steel industry and help to lower CO2 emissions. View Full-Text
Keywords: basic oxygen furnace slag; supplementary cementitious materials; cementitious material; blended materials basic oxygen furnace slag; supplementary cementitious materials; cementitious material; blended materials
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Lin, W.-T.; Tsai, C.-J.; Chen, J.; Liu, W. Feasibility and Characterization Mortar Blended with High-Amount Basic Oxygen Furnace Slag. Materials 2019, 12, 6.

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