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Article

Energy Saving Potentials of Phase Change Materials Applied to Lightweight Building Envelopes

1
Integrated Research Institute of Construction and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, Korea
2
Department of Architectural Engineering, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2013, 6(10), 5219-5230; https://doi.org/10.3390/en6105219
Received: 21 August 2013 / Revised: 20 September 2013 / Accepted: 23 September 2013 / Published: 14 October 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficient Building Design 2013)
Phase change materials (PCMs) have been considered as an innovative technology that can reduce the peak loads and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) energy consumption in buildings. Basically they are substances capable of storing or releasing thermal energy as latent heat. Because the amount of latent heat absorbed or released is much larger than the sensible heat, the application of PCMs in buildings has significant potential to reduce energy consumption. However, because each PCM has its own phase change temperature, which is the temperature at which latent heat is absorbed or released, it is important to use an appropriate PCM for the purpose of building envelope design. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the energy saving potentials in buildings when various PCMs with different phase change temperatures are applied to a lightweight building envelope by analyzing the thermal load characteristics. As results, the annual heating load increased at every phase change temperature, but the peak heating load decreased by 3.19% with heptadecane (phase change temperature 21 °C), and the lowest indoor temperature increased by 0.86 °C with heptadecane (phase change temperature 21 °C). The annual cooling load decreased by 1.05% with dodecanol (phase change temperature 24 °C), the peak cooling load decreased by 1.30% with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C), and the highest indoor temperature dropped by 0.50 °C with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C). When the night ventilation was applied to the building HVAC system for better passive cooling performance, the annual cooling load decreased by 9.28% with dodecanol (phase change temperature 24 °C), the peak load decreased by 11.33% with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C), and the highest indoor temperature dropped by 0.85 °C with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C). View Full-Text
Keywords: phase change materials (PCMs); lightweight building envelope; heating load; cooling load; phase change temperature phase change materials (PCMs); lightweight building envelope; heating load; cooling load; phase change temperature
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MDPI and ACS Style

Seong, Y.-B.; Lim, J.-H. Energy Saving Potentials of Phase Change Materials Applied to Lightweight Building Envelopes. Energies 2013, 6, 5219-5230. https://doi.org/10.3390/en6105219

AMA Style

Seong Y-B, Lim J-H. Energy Saving Potentials of Phase Change Materials Applied to Lightweight Building Envelopes. Energies. 2013; 6(10):5219-5230. https://doi.org/10.3390/en6105219

Chicago/Turabian Style

Seong, Yoon-Bok, and Jae-Han Lim. 2013. "Energy Saving Potentials of Phase Change Materials Applied to Lightweight Building Envelopes" Energies 6, no. 10: 5219-5230. https://doi.org/10.3390/en6105219

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