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Open AccessArticle

The Energy Lock-In Effect of Solar Home Systems: A Case Study in Rural Nigeria

Centre for Environment and Sustainability, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
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Energies 2020, 13(24), 6682; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13246682
Received: 23 November 2020 / Revised: 12 December 2020 / Accepted: 14 December 2020 / Published: 17 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy for Sustainable Future)
Ongoing reductions in the costs of solar PV and battery technologies have contributed to an increased use of home energy systems in Sub-Saharan African regions without grid access. However, such systems can normally support only low-power end uses, and there has been little research regarding the impact on households unable to transition to higher-wattage energy services in the continued absence of the grid. This paper examines the challenges facing rural energy transitions and whether households feel they are energy ‘locked in’. A mixed-methods approach using questionnaire-based household energy surveys of rural solar home system (SHS) users was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data. Thematic analysis and a mixture of descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were applied. The results showed that a significant number of households possessed appliances that could not be powered by their SHS and were willing to spend large sums to connect were a higher-capacity option available. This implied that a significant number of the households were locked into a low-energy future. Swarm electrification technology and energy efficient, DC-powered plug-and-play appliances were suggested as means to move the households to higher tiers of electricity access. View Full-Text
Keywords: solar home systems; rural households; energy transitions; energy access solar home systems; rural households; energy transitions; energy access
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hassan, O.; Morse, S.; Leach, M. The Energy Lock-In Effect of Solar Home Systems: A Case Study in Rural Nigeria. Energies 2020, 13, 6682. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13246682

AMA Style

Hassan O, Morse S, Leach M. The Energy Lock-In Effect of Solar Home Systems: A Case Study in Rural Nigeria. Energies. 2020; 13(24):6682. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13246682

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hassan, Olumide; Morse, Stephen; Leach, Matthew. 2020. "The Energy Lock-In Effect of Solar Home Systems: A Case Study in Rural Nigeria" Energies 13, no. 24: 6682. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13246682

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