Next Article in Journal
A Method to Enhance the Global Efficiency of High-Power Photovoltaic Inverters Connected in Parallel
Previous Article in Journal
Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Modelling of Loads Variation and Fatigue Life of a Full-Scale Tidal Turbine under the Effect of Velocity Profile
Previous Article in Special Issue
Development of a Passive and Active Technology Package Standard and Database for Application to Zero Energy Buildings in South Korea
Open AccessArticle

Energy Renovation versus Demolition and Construction of a New Building—A Comparative Analysis of a Swedish Multi-Family Building

1
Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden
2
Division of Building, Energy and Environment Technology, Department of Technology and Environment, University of Gävle, 801 76 Gävle, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2019, 12(11), 2218; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12112218
Received: 3 May 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 11 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Both New and Rehabilitated)
  |  
PDF [2546 KB, uploaded 11 June 2019]
  |  

Abstract

This study addresses the life cycle costs (LCC) of energy renovation, and the demolition and construction of a new building. A comparison is made between LCC optimal energy renovations of four different building types with thermal performance, representing Swedish constructions from the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, as well as the demolition of the building and construction of a new building that complies with the Swedish building code. A Swedish multi-family building from the 1960s is used as a reference building. LCC optimal energy renovations are identified with energy saving targets ranging between 10% and 70%, in addition to the lowest possible life cycle cost. The analyses show that an ambitious energy renovation is not cost-optimal in any of the studied buildings, if achieving the lowest LCC is the objective function. The cost of the demolition and construction of a new building is higher compared to energy renovation to the same energy performance. The higher rent in new buildings does not compensate for the higher cost of new construction. A more ambitious renovation is required in buildings that have a shape factor with a high internal volume to heated floor area ratio. View Full-Text
Keywords: renovation; energy renovation; demolition; new construction; energy use; energy performance; life cycle cost; optimization; OPERA-MILP; multi-family buildings renovation; energy renovation; demolition; new construction; energy use; energy performance; life cycle cost; optimization; OPERA-MILP; multi-family buildings
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

La Fleur, L.; Rohdin, P.; Moshfegh, B. Energy Renovation versus Demolition and Construction of a New Building—A Comparative Analysis of a Swedish Multi-Family Building. Energies 2019, 12, 2218.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Energies EISSN 1996-1073 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top