Next Article in Journal
A Load-Shedding Model Based on Sensitivity Analysis in on-Line Power System Operation Risk Assessment
Previous Article in Journal
Single Inductor-Multiple Output DPWM DC-DC Boost Converter with a High Efficiency and Small Area
Article

Mitigation of Hot-Spots in Photovoltaic Systems Using Distributed Power Electronics

1
Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Automatic Control Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
2
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA
3
Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2018, 11(4), 726; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11040726
Received: 6 February 2018 / Revised: 13 March 2018 / Accepted: 14 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Section H: Energy Fundamentals and Conversion)
In the presence of partial shading and other mismatch factors, bypass diodes may not offer complete elimination of excessive power dissipation due to cell reverse biasing, commonly referred to as hot-spotting in photovoltaic (PV) systems. As a result, PV systems may experience higher failure rates and accelerated ageing. In this paper, a cell-level simulation model is used to assess occurrence of hot-spotting events in a representative residential rooftop system scenario featuring a moderate shading environment. The approach is further used to examine how well distributed power electronics converters mitigate the effects of partial shading and other sources of mismatch by preventing activation of bypass diodes and thereby reducing the chances of heavy power dissipation and hot-spotting in mismatched cells. The simulation results confirm that the occurrence of heavy power dissipation is reduced in all distributed power electronics architectures, and that submodule-level converters offer nearly 100% mitigation of hot-spotting. In addition, the paper further elaborates on the possibility of hot-spot-induced permanent damage, predicting a lifetime energy loss above 15%. This energy loss is fully recoverable with submodule-level power converters that mitigate hot-spotting and prevent the damage. View Full-Text
Keywords: photovoltaics; bypass diodes; power electronics; subMICs; partial-shading; hot-spotting; converters; balancing; reliability; accelerated ageing photovoltaics; bypass diodes; power electronics; subMICs; partial-shading; hot-spotting; converters; balancing; reliability; accelerated ageing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Olalla, C.; Hasan, M.N.; Deline, C.; Maksimović, D. Mitigation of Hot-Spots in Photovoltaic Systems Using Distributed Power Electronics. Energies 2018, 11, 726. https://doi.org/10.3390/en11040726

AMA Style

Olalla C, Hasan MN, Deline C, Maksimović D. Mitigation of Hot-Spots in Photovoltaic Systems Using Distributed Power Electronics. Energies. 2018; 11(4):726. https://doi.org/10.3390/en11040726

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olalla, Carlos, Md. N. Hasan, Chris Deline, and Dragan Maksimović. 2018. "Mitigation of Hot-Spots in Photovoltaic Systems Using Distributed Power Electronics" Energies 11, no. 4: 726. https://doi.org/10.3390/en11040726

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop