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Article

Potential of Tropical Fruit Waste Biomass for Production of Bio-Briquette Fuel: Using Indonesia as an Example

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Department of Material Science and Manufacturing Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
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Department of Sustainable Technologies, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
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Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2017, 10(12), 2119; https://doi.org/10.3390/en10122119
Received: 10 October 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section K: Energy Sources)
Within developing countries, there is an appeal to use waste biomass for energy generation in the form of bio-briquettes. This study investigated the potential use of bio-briquettes that are produced from the waste biomass of the following tropical fruits: durian (Durio zibethinus), coconut (Cocos nucifera), coffee (Coffea arabica), cacao (Theobroma cacao), banana (Musa acuminata) and rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum). All fruit waste biomass samples exhibited an extremely high level of initial moisture content (78.22% in average). Fruit samples with the highest proportion of fruit waste biomass (of total unprocessed fruit mass) were represented by cacao (83.82%), durian (62.56%) and coconut (56.83%). Highest energy potentials (calorific value) of fruit waste biomass were observed in case of coconut (18.22 MJ∙kg−1), banana (17.79 MJ∙kg−1) and durian (17.60 MJ∙kg−1) fruit samples, whereas fruit waste biomass with the lowest level of ash content originated from the rambutan (3.67%), coconut (4.52%), and durian (5.05%) fruit samples. When investigating the energy demands to produce bio-briquettes from such feedstock materials, the best results (lowest amount of required deformation energy in combination with highest level of bio-briquette bulk density) were achieved by the rambutan, durian and banana fruit waste biomass samples. Finally, all investigated bio-briquette samples presented satisfactory levels of bulk density (>1050 kg∙m−3). In conclusion, our results indicated the practicability and viability of such bio-briquette fuel production, as well as supporting the fact that bio-briquettes from tropical fruit waste biomass can offer a potentially attractive energy source with many benefits, especially in rural areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: solid biofuel; calorific value; briquetting; fruit residue; renewable energy solid biofuel; calorific value; briquetting; fruit residue; renewable energy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brunerová, A.; Roubík, H.; Brožek, M.; Herák, D.; Šleger, V.; Mazancová, J. Potential of Tropical Fruit Waste Biomass for Production of Bio-Briquette Fuel: Using Indonesia as an Example. Energies 2017, 10, 2119. https://doi.org/10.3390/en10122119

AMA Style

Brunerová A, Roubík H, Brožek M, Herák D, Šleger V, Mazancová J. Potential of Tropical Fruit Waste Biomass for Production of Bio-Briquette Fuel: Using Indonesia as an Example. Energies. 2017; 10(12):2119. https://doi.org/10.3390/en10122119

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brunerová, Anna, Hynek Roubík, Milan Brožek, David Herák, Vladimír Šleger, and Jana Mazancová. 2017. "Potential of Tropical Fruit Waste Biomass for Production of Bio-Briquette Fuel: Using Indonesia as an Example" Energies 10, no. 12: 2119. https://doi.org/10.3390/en10122119

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