Next Article in Journal
Effect of Lenalidomide Maintenance in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis and Trial-Sequential Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
A Review of Trastuzumab Biosimilars in Early Breast Cancer and Real World Outcomes of Neoadjuvant MYL-1401O versus Reference Trastuzumab
Article

Retrospective Analysis of Emotional Burden and the Need for Support of Patients and Their Informal Caregivers after Palliative Radiation Treatment for Brain Metastases

1
Institute for Radiation Oncology, Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, 8401 Winterthur, Switzerland
2
Center for Palliative Care, Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, 8401 Winterthur, Switzerland
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Competence Center for Palliative Care, University Hospital and Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(6), 4235-4244; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060338
Received: 27 March 2022 / Revised: 7 June 2022 / Accepted: 9 June 2022 / Published: 11 June 2022
Cancer burdens not only the patients themselves but also their personal environment. A few studies have already focused on the mental health and personal needs of caregivers of patients. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to further assess the emotional burden and unmet needs for support of caregivers in a population of brain metastasis patients. In the time period 2013–2020, we identified 42 informal caregivers of their respective patients after palliative radiation treatment for brain metastases. The caregivers completed two standardized questionnaires about different treatment aspects, their emotional burden, and unmet needs for support. Involvement of psycho-oncology and palliative care was examined in a chart review. The majority of the caregivers (71.4%, n = 30) suffered from high emotional burden during cancer treatment of their relatives and showed unmet needs for emotional and psychosocial support, mostly referring to information needs and the involvement in the patient’s treatment decisions. Other unmet needs referred to handling personal needs and fears of dealing with the sick cancer patient in terms of practical care tasks and appropriate communication. Palliative care was involved in 30 cases and psycho-oncology in 12 cases. There is a high need for emotional and psychosocial support in informal caregivers of cancer patients. There might still be room for an improvement of psychosocial and psycho-oncological support. Care planning should cater to the emotional burden and unmet needs of informal caregivers as well. Further prospective studies in larger samples should be performed in order to confirm this analysis. View Full-Text
Keywords: informal caregivers; needs for support; emotional burden; palliative care; brain metastases informal caregivers; needs for support; emotional burden; palliative care; brain metastases
Show Figures

Figure A1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lütscher, J.; Siegenthaler, C.H.; Hertler, C.; Blum, D.; Windisch, P.; Shaker, R.G.; Schröder, C.; Zwahlen, D.R. Retrospective Analysis of Emotional Burden and the Need for Support of Patients and Their Informal Caregivers after Palliative Radiation Treatment for Brain Metastases. Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29, 4235-4244. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060338

AMA Style

Lütscher J, Siegenthaler CH, Hertler C, Blum D, Windisch P, Shaker RG, Schröder C, Zwahlen DR. Retrospective Analysis of Emotional Burden and the Need for Support of Patients and Their Informal Caregivers after Palliative Radiation Treatment for Brain Metastases. Current Oncology. 2022; 29(6):4235-4244. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060338

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lütscher, Jamie, Christa H. Siegenthaler, Caroline Hertler, David Blum, Paul Windisch, Renate G. Shaker, Christina Schröder, and Daniel R. Zwahlen. 2022. "Retrospective Analysis of Emotional Burden and the Need for Support of Patients and Their Informal Caregivers after Palliative Radiation Treatment for Brain Metastases" Current Oncology 29, no. 6: 4235-4244. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060338

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop