Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Psychosocial and Functional Predictors of Mental Disorder among Prostate Cancer Survivors: Informing Survivorship Care Programs with Evidence-Based Knowledge
Previous Article in Journal
Spinal Manifestation of Malignant Primary (PLB) and Secondary Bone Lymphoma (SLB)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Acceptance of Psycho-Oncological Counseling Formats in a Cancer Counseling Center during the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Exploratory Care Study

This is an early access version, the complete PDF, HTML, and XML versions will be available soon.

Article

Treatment Regret, Mental and Physical Health Indicators of Psychosocial Well-Being among Prostate Cancer Survivors

1
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 1V7, Canada
2
Department of Urology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
3
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
5
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 1V7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(5), 3900-3917; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050333
Received: 3 August 2021 / Revised: 13 September 2021 / Accepted: 14 September 2021 / Published: 2 October 2021
Prostate cancer (PCa) patients and survivors are at high risk of mental health illness. Here, we examined the contribution of treatment regret, mental and physical health indicators to the social/family, emotional, functional and spiritual well-being of PCa survivors. The study assessed 367 men with a history of PCa residing in the Maritimes Canada who were surveyed between 2017 and 2021. The outcomes were social/family, emotional, functional and spiritual well-being (FACT-P,FACIT-Sp). Predictor variables included urinary, bowel and sexual function (UCLA-PCI), physical and mental health (SF-12), and treatment regret. Logistic regression analyses were controlled for age, income, and survivorship time. Poor social/family, emotional, functional and spiritual well-being was identified among 54.4%, 26.5%, 49.9% and 63.8% of the men in the sample. Men who reported treatment regret had 3.62, 5.58, or 4.63 higher odds of poor social/family, emotional, and functional well-being, respectively. Men with low household income had 3.77 times higher odds for poor social/ well-being. Good mental health was a protective factor for poor social/family, emotional, functional, or spiritual well-being. Better physical and sexual health were protective factors for poor functional well-being. Seeking to promote PCa patients’ autonomy in treatment decisions and recognizing this process’ vulnerability in health care contexts is warranted.
Keywords: prostate cancer; treatment regret; quality of life; cancer survivorship; emotional well-being; functional well-being; spiritual well-being; social well-being; patient autonomy prostate cancer; treatment regret; quality of life; cancer survivorship; emotional well-being; functional well-being; spiritual well-being; social well-being; patient autonomy
MDPI and ACS Style

Bradley, C.; Ilie, G.; MacDonald, C.; Massoeurs, L.; Cam-Tu, J.D.; Rutledge, R.D.H. Treatment Regret, Mental and Physical Health Indicators of Psychosocial Well-Being among Prostate Cancer Survivors. Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28, 3900-3917. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050333

AMA Style

Bradley C, Ilie G, MacDonald C, Massoeurs L, Cam-Tu JD, Rutledge RDH. Treatment Regret, Mental and Physical Health Indicators of Psychosocial Well-Being among Prostate Cancer Survivors. Current Oncology. 2021; 28(5):3900-3917. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050333

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bradley, Cassidy, Gabriela Ilie, Cody MacDonald, Lia Massoeurs, Jasmine D. Cam-Tu, and Robert D.H. Rutledge 2021. "Treatment Regret, Mental and Physical Health Indicators of Psychosocial Well-Being among Prostate Cancer Survivors" Current Oncology 28, no. 5: 3900-3917. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050333

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop