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Current Oncology is published by MDPI from Volume 28 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Multimed Inc..
Article

Using Family History Forms in Pediatric Oncology to Identify Patients for Genetic Assessment

by 1, 2, 3, 1,2, 1,3 and 1,2,*
1
Research Institute, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2
Department of Genetics, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L1, Canada
3
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2017, 24(6), 441-445; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.24.3710
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 11 October 2017 / Accepted: 3 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
Objective: We set out to identify and offer genetic testing to the 5–10% of pediatric cancer patients who have been estimated to carry germline mutations in inherited cancer predisposition syndromes. Clinical genetic testing has become widely available, and thus in busy oncology clinics, tools are needed to identify patients who could benefit from a referral to genetics. Methods: We studied the clinical utility of administering a family history form in the pediatric oncology long-term follow-up clinic to identify patients who might have an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome. Genetic testing involved primarily Sanger sequencing in clia (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments)–certified laboratories. Results: Of 57 patients who completed forms, 19 (33.3%) met criteria for referral to genetics. A significant family history of cancer was present for 4 patients, and 12 patients underwent genetic testing. Of 18 genetic tests ordered, none identified a pathogenic mutation, likely because of a small sample size and a candidate-gene approach to testing. Three families were also identified for further assessment based on a family history of breast cancer, with two of families having members eligible for BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing. Conclusions: Genetic testing in pediatric oncology patients is important to guide the management of patients who have an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome and to identify other family members at risk when mutations are identified. When no mutations are identified, that information is often reassuring to families who are worried about siblings. However, in the absence of an identified genetic cause in a patient, some uncertainty remains.
Keywords: cancer genetics; genomics; inherited cancer predisposition syndromes; pediatric oncology; family histories; pediatric genetic testing cancer genetics; genomics; inherited cancer predisposition syndromes; pediatric oncology; family histories; pediatric genetic testing
MDPI and ACS Style

Hamilton, A.; Smith, E.; Hamon, J.; Tomiak, E.; Bassal, M.; Sawyer, S.L. Using Family History Forms in Pediatric Oncology to Identify Patients for Genetic Assessment. Curr. Oncol. 2017, 24, 441-445. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.24.3710

AMA Style

Hamilton A, Smith E, Hamon J, Tomiak E, Bassal M, Sawyer SL. Using Family History Forms in Pediatric Oncology to Identify Patients for Genetic Assessment. Current Oncology. 2017; 24(6):441-445. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.24.3710

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hamilton, A., E. Smith, J. Hamon, E. Tomiak, M. Bassal, and S.L. Sawyer. 2017. "Using Family History Forms in Pediatric Oncology to Identify Patients for Genetic Assessment" Current Oncology 24, no. 6: 441-445. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.24.3710

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