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Article

Estimating the National Wage Loss from Cancer in Canada

by 1,2,*, 1,2 and 3
1
Programs for the Assessment of Technology in Health (PATH) Research Institute, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3
Strategic Market Leadership and Health Services Management, DeGroote School of Business, Mc- Master University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2010, 17(2), 40-49; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v17i2.477
Received: 1 March 2010 / Revised: 5 March 2010 / Accepted: 5 March 2010 / Published: 1 April 2010
Objectives: Using primary and secondary data sources, we set out to estimate the Canadian wage loss from cancer for patients, caregivers, and parents from a patient and a societal perspective. Methods: First, a multiple-database literature search was conducted to find Canadian-specific direct surveys of wage loss from cancer. Second, estimates for wage loss were generated from the nationally representative Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Cycle 3.1. In addition, both estimates were standardized to derive a friction-period estimate and were extrapolated to produce national annual estimates. Results: The literature search identified six direct surveys that included a total of 1632 patients with cancer. The CCHS Cycle 3.1 included 2287 patients with cancer. Overall, based on the direct surveys, newly diagnosed cancer patients reduced their labour participation in the friction period by 36% ($4,518), and caregivers lost 23% of their workable hours ($2,887). The CCHS estimated that annual household income was 26.5% lower ($4,978) for respondents with cancer as compared with the general population. For the year 2009, results from direct surveys indicated that new cancers in Canada generated a wage loss of $3.18 billion; the CCHS Cycle 3.1 estimate was $2.95 billion. Conclusions: Wage loss from cancer is a significant economic burden on patients, their families, and society in Canada, with direct surveys and the CCHS providing similar estimates.
Keywords: productivity; societal cost of cancer; burden; indirect cost; wage loss productivity; societal cost of cancer; burden; indirect cost; wage loss
MDPI and ACS Style

Hopkins, R.B.; Goeree, R.; Longo, C.J. Estimating the National Wage Loss from Cancer in Canada. Curr. Oncol. 2010, 17, 40-49. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v17i2.477

AMA Style

Hopkins RB, Goeree R, Longo CJ. Estimating the National Wage Loss from Cancer in Canada. Current Oncology. 2010; 17(2):40-49. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v17i2.477

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hopkins, R.B.; Goeree, R.; Longo, C.J. 2010. "Estimating the National Wage Loss from Cancer in Canada" Curr. Oncol. 17, no. 2: 40-49. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v17i2.477

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