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Role Identity, Dissonance, and Distress among Paramedics
Article

Mental Disorder Symptoms and the Relationship with Resilience among Paramedics in a Single Canadian Site

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Peel Regional Paramedic Services, Operations, Fernforest Division, 1600 Bovaird Drive East, Brampton, ON L6V 4R5, Canada
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Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, HSC-2C1, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
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School of Social Work, The University of Windsor, 167 Ferry Street, Room 167, Windsor, ON N9A 0C5, Canada
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School of Rehabilitation Sciences, McMaster University, 1400 Main Street West, Institute for Applied Health Sciences (IAHS) Building, Room 403, Hamilton, ON L8S 1C7, Canada
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Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, 100 West 5th Street, Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7, Canada
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Department of Innovation in Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, 850 Peter Morand Crescent, Room 102, Ottawa, ON K1G 5Z3, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Florian Fischer and Jyu-Lin Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4879; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084879
Received: 9 February 2022 / Revised: 13 April 2022 / Accepted: 15 April 2022 / Published: 17 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Safety Personnel: Mental Health and Well-Being)
There is growing recognition in research and policy of a mental health crisis among Canada’s paramedics; however, despite this, epidemiological surveillance of the problem is in its infancy. Just weeks before the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, we surveyed paramedics from a single, large, urban paramedic service in Ontario, Canada to assess for symptom clusters consistent with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder and to identify potential risk factors for each. In total, we received 589 completed surveys (97% completion rate) and found that 11% screened positive for PTSD, 15% screened positive for major depressive disorder, and 15% screened positive for generalized anxiety disorder, with one in four active-duty paramedics screening positive for any of the three as recently as February 2020. In adjusted analyses, the risk of a positive screen varied as a function of employment classification, gender, self-reported resilience, and previous experience as a member of the service’s peer support team. Our findings support the position that paramedics screen positive for mental disorders at high rates—a problem likely to have worsened since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. We echo the calls of researchers and policymakers for urgent action to support paramedic mental health in Canada. View Full-Text
Keywords: public safety personnel; first responders; mental disorders; mental health; wellbeing; trauma; operational stress injuries; post-traumatic stress injuries; resilience; peer support public safety personnel; first responders; mental disorders; mental health; wellbeing; trauma; operational stress injuries; post-traumatic stress injuries; resilience; peer support
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mausz, J.; Donnelly, E.A.; Moll, S.; Harms, S.; McConnell, M. Mental Disorder Symptoms and the Relationship with Resilience among Paramedics in a Single Canadian Site. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084879

AMA Style

Mausz J, Donnelly EA, Moll S, Harms S, McConnell M. Mental Disorder Symptoms and the Relationship with Resilience among Paramedics in a Single Canadian Site. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(8):4879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084879

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mausz, Justin, Elizabeth A. Donnelly, Sandra Moll, Sheila Harms, and Meghan McConnell. 2022. "Mental Disorder Symptoms and the Relationship with Resilience among Paramedics in a Single Canadian Site" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 8: 4879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084879

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