Next Article in Journal
Shared but Clean Household Toilets: What Makes This Possible? Evidence from Ghana and Kenya
Next Article in Special Issue
COVID-19 Pandemic-Related Sleep and Mental Health Disparities among Students at a Hispanic and Minority-Serving Institution
Previous Article in Journal
Shyness and School Engagement in Chinese Suburban Preschoolers: A Moderated Mediation Model of Teacher–Child Closeness and Child Gender
Previous Article in Special Issue
Hair Cortisol, Perceived Stress, and the Effect of Group Dynamics: A Longitudinal Study of Young Men during Compulsory Military Training in Lithuania
 
 
Viewpoint

Development of an Extended-Reality (XR)-Based Intervention to Treat Adolescent Obesity

1
Department of Health Science and Human Ecology, California State University, San Bernardino, CA 92407, USA
2
Department of Kinesiology, California State University, San Bernardino, CA 92407, USA
3
Couples and Family Therapy Program, Alliant International University, Alhambra, CA 91803, USA
4
Department of Communication Studies, California State University, San Bernardino, CA 92407, USA
5
Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Li-Tung Huang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 4264; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074264
Received: 17 February 2022 / Revised: 22 March 2022 / Accepted: 24 March 2022 / Published: 2 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergent Topics in Young Adult Health Disparities)
Public health policies aimed at obesity reduction are more often directed toward adults than children. This is alarming given that rates of childhood obesity have been steadily increasing, and, if not treated early, adolescents with obesity may develop comorbidities into adulthood. Lifestyle-based interventions are the cornerstone of childhood obesity treatment. Recently, extended-reality (XR)-based interventions have been incorporated into the treatment of obesity, and parents and adolescents perceive virtual reality (VR) interventions as a promising approach to increasing physical activity levels and improving eating habits. VR is a tool that fits perfectly with contemporary adolescent culture, which is radically different from that of just two generations ago. It is plausible that an XR-based intervention for treating adolescents with obesity could have a profound influence on obesity management over the long-term. An understanding of adolescents’ preferences, wants, and needs must be considered in the development of new interventions. We suggest that VR interventions can provide a new approach to weight management for children and adolescents and provide recommendations to assess adolescents’, caregivers’, and primary care providers’ needs. These needs could then be used for the development of an XR-based intervention aimed at inducing sustained lifestyle changes in adolescents with obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; adolescence; virtual reality; extended reality obesity; adolescence; virtual reality; extended reality
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Malik, N.; Prado, W.L.; Lappan, S.; Popescu, M.; Haddock, B.; Hill, J.O. Development of an Extended-Reality (XR)-Based Intervention to Treat Adolescent Obesity. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4264. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074264

AMA Style

Malik N, Prado WL, Lappan S, Popescu M, Haddock B, Hill JO. Development of an Extended-Reality (XR)-Based Intervention to Treat Adolescent Obesity. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(7):4264. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074264

Chicago/Turabian Style

Malik, Neal, Wagner L. Prado, Sara Lappan, Mihaela Popescu, Bryan Haddock, and James O. Hill. 2022. "Development of an Extended-Reality (XR)-Based Intervention to Treat Adolescent Obesity" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 7: 4264. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074264

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop