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Article

Genetic Variation in Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. Ticks across Arizona

1
Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2
Medical Branch Department of Pathology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
3
Arlington Department of Biology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tammi Johnson and Adela Oliva Chavez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 4223; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074223
Received: 29 January 2022 / Revised: 22 March 2022 / Accepted: 29 March 2022 / Published: 1 April 2022
Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. (Latreille, 1806), the brown dog tick, is the most widely distributed tick species in the world. The two dominant lineages, a temperate group and a tropical group, are recognized as important disease vectors for both dogs and humans. The temperate and tropical lineages overlap in range in some regions of the world, including the southwestern United States, where recent outbreaks of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are linked to R. sanguineus s.l. While it is unclear to what extent they may differ in their capacity to transmit pathogens, finer-scale resolution of temperate and tropical lineage distribution may provide insight into the ecology of these two tick groups and the epidemiology of R. sanguineus s.l.-vectored diseases. Using diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assays, we examined the geospatial trends in R. sanguineus s.l. lineages throughout Arizona. We found the temperate and tropical lineages were well delineated, with some overlap in the eastern part of the state. In one county, tropical and temperate ticks were collected on the same dog host, demonstrating that the two lineages are living in sympatry in some instances and may co-feed on the same host. View Full-Text
Keywords: ticks; acarology; Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks; acarology; Rhipicephalus sanguineus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brophy, M.; Riehle, M.A.; Mastrud, N.; Ravenscraft, A.; Adamson, J.E.; Walker, K.R. Genetic Variation in Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. Ticks across Arizona. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074223

AMA Style

Brophy M, Riehle MA, Mastrud N, Ravenscraft A, Adamson JE, Walker KR. Genetic Variation in Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. Ticks across Arizona. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(7):4223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074223

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brophy, Maureen, Michael A. Riehle, Nikki Mastrud, Alison Ravenscraft, Johnathan E. Adamson, and Kathleen R. Walker. 2022. "Genetic Variation in Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. Ticks across Arizona" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 7: 4223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074223

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