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Systematic Review

Do Patients with Prostate Cancer Benefit from Exercise Interventions? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1
Department of Physiotherapy, University College of Northern Denmark, Selma Lagerløfs Vej 2, DK-9200 Aalborg, Denmark
2
Mental Health Centre Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Nordstjernevej 41, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark
3
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark
4
The University Hospitals’ Centre for Health Research, Rigshospitalet, Ryesgade 27, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(2), 972; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020972
Received: 30 November 2021 / Revised: 6 January 2022 / Accepted: 12 January 2022 / Published: 15 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Well-Being and Quality of Life in the Elderly)
Men diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer experience severe adverse effects on quality of life (QoL) and metabolic health, some of which may be preventable or reversible with exercise, the benefits of which healthcare providers and patients increasingly acknowledge, though existing evidence on its effects varies in significance and magnitude. We aimed to review the effect of exercise on QoL and metabolic health in a broad prostate cancer population. A systematic search was conducted in nine databases and eligible trials were included in the meta-analytic procedure. All outcomes were stratified into aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and a combination of both. The review identified 33 randomised controlled trials (2567 participants) eligible for inclusion. Exercise had a borderline small positive effect on cancer-specific QoL (standardised mean difference (SMD) = 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.01–0.22), and a moderate to large effect on cardiovascular fitness (SMD = 0.46, 95% CI 0.34–0.59) with aerobic exercise being the superior modality (SMD = 0.60, 95% CI 0.29–0.90). A positive significant effect was seen in lower body strength, whole-body fat mass, general mental health, and blood pressure. No significant effect was seen in fatigue, lean body mass, and general physical health. We thereby conclude that exercise is effective in improving metabolic health in men diagnosed with prostate cancer, with aerobic exercise as the superior modality. The effect of exercise on QoL was small and not mediated by choice of exercise modality. View Full-Text
Keywords: quality of life; metabolic health; prostate cancer; exercise; frailty; older adults; health quality of life; metabolic health; prostate cancer; exercise; frailty; older adults; health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Andersen, M.F.; Midtgaard, J.; Bjerre, E.D. Do Patients with Prostate Cancer Benefit from Exercise Interventions? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 972. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020972

AMA Style

Andersen MF, Midtgaard J, Bjerre ED. Do Patients with Prostate Cancer Benefit from Exercise Interventions? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(2):972. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020972

Chicago/Turabian Style

Andersen, Martin F., Julie Midtgaard, and Eik D. Bjerre. 2022. "Do Patients with Prostate Cancer Benefit from Exercise Interventions? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 2: 972. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020972

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