Next Article in Journal
A Priori Dietary Patterns, Physical Activity Level, and Body Composition in Postmenopausal Women: A Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Journal
Improvement in the Management of Oral Anticoagulation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in Primary Health Care
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Impact of Social Network Characteristics on Health among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Korea: Application of Social Network Analysis
 
 
Review

Neighbourhood Socioeconomic Processes and Dynamics and Healthy Ageing: A Scoping Review

1
EPIUnit-Instituto de Saúde Pública, Universidade do Porto, 4050-600 Porto, Portugal
2
Laboratório para a Investigação Integrativa e Translacional em Saúde Populacional (ITR), 4050-600 Porto, Portugal
3
Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research (CERH), University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90570 Oulu, Finland
4
Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90570 Oulu, Finland
5
Departamento de Ciências da Saúde Pública e Forenses e Educação Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ji-Hyuk Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6745; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116745
Received: 28 April 2022 / Revised: 26 May 2022 / Accepted: 30 May 2022 / Published: 31 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Economic Determinants of Healthy Ageing)
Elderly citizens are concentrated in urban areas and are particularly affected by the immediate residential environment. Cities are unequal and segregated places, where there is an intensification of urban change processes such as gentrification and displacement. We aimed to understand how neighbourhood socioeconomic processes and dynamics influence older people’s health. Three bibliographic databases—PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus—were used to identify evidence of the influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation, socio-spatial segregation, urban renewal, and gentrification on healthy ageing. We followed the method of Arksey and O’Malley, Levac and colleagues, the Joanna Briggs Institute, and the PRISMA-ScR. The included studies (n = 122) were published between 2001 and 2021. Most evaluated neighbourhood deprivation (n = 114), followed by gentrification (n = 5), segregation (n = 2), and urban renewal (n = 1). Overall, older people living in deprived neighbourhoods had worse healthy ageing outcomes than their counterparts living in more advantaged neighbourhoods. Older adults pointed out more negative comments than positive ones for gentrification and urban renewal. As to segregation, the direction of the association was not entirely clear. In conclusion, the literature has not extensively analysed the effects of segregation, gentrification, and urban renewal on healthy ageing, and more quantitative and longitudinal studies should be conducted to draw better inferences. View Full-Text
Keywords: older adults; neighbourhood socioeconomic status; neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation; neighbourhood segregation; gentrification; urban renewal; age-friendly communities older adults; neighbourhood socioeconomic status; neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation; neighbourhood segregation; gentrification; urban renewal; age-friendly communities
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Santos, C.J.; Paciência, I.; Ribeiro, A.I. Neighbourhood Socioeconomic Processes and Dynamics and Healthy Ageing: A Scoping Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6745. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116745

AMA Style

Santos CJ, Paciência I, Ribeiro AI. Neighbourhood Socioeconomic Processes and Dynamics and Healthy Ageing: A Scoping Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(11):6745. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116745

Chicago/Turabian Style

Santos, Cláudia Jardim, Inês Paciência, and Ana Isabel Ribeiro. 2022. "Neighbourhood Socioeconomic Processes and Dynamics and Healthy Ageing: A Scoping Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 11: 6745. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116745

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop