Next Article in Journal
Construction of Low-Carbon Ferry—A Case of Jingning, China
Next Article in Special Issue
Seroprevalence Rates against West Nile, Usutu, and Tick-Borne Encephalitis Viruses in Blood-Donors from North-Western Romania
Previous Article in Journal
Quality of Life of Gynaeoncology Patients and Family Caregivers
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Model to Estimate the Effect of International Traffic on Malaria Cases: The Case of Japan from 1999 to 2021
 
 
Article

The Effects of Meteorological Factors on Dengue Cases in Malaysia

1
Institute for Medical Research, Ministry of Health, Shah Alam 40170, Malaysia
2
Institute for Research, Development and Innovation (IRDI), International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia
3
School of Medicine, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia
4
Centre for Environmental and Population Health, Institute for Research, Development and Innovation (IRDI), International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia
5
Vector Borne Disease Control Division, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Putrajaya 62000, Malaysia
6
HR Wallingford, Wallingford OX10 8BA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Andrea Trevisan, Chiara Bertoncello, Marco Fonzo and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6449; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116449
Received: 18 April 2022 / Revised: 23 May 2022 / Accepted: 24 May 2022 / Published: 26 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vector-Borne Diseases and Public Health)
Dengue is a vector-borne disease affected by meteorological factors and is commonly recorded from ground stations. Data from ground station have limited spatial representation and accuracy, which can be overcome using satellite-based Earth Observation (EO) recordings instead. EO-based meteorological recordings can help to provide a better understanding of the correlations between meteorological variables and dengue cases. This paper aimed to first validate the satellite-based (EO) data of temperature, wind speed, and rainfall using ground station data. Subsequently, we aimed to determine if the spatially matched EO data correlated with dengue fever cases from 2011 to 2019 in Malaysia. EO data were spatially matched with the data from four ground stations located at states and districts in the central (Selangor, Petaling) and east coast (Kelantan, Kota Baharu) geographical regions of Peninsular Malaysia. Spearman’s rank-order correlation coefficient (ρ) was performed to examine the correlation between EO and ground station data. A cross-correlation analysis with an eight-week lag period was performed to examine the magnitude of correlation between EO data and dengue case across the three time periods (2011–2019, 2015–2019, 2011–2014). The highest correlation between the ground-based stations and corresponding EO data were reported for temperature (mean ρ = 0.779), followed by rainfall (mean ρ = 0.687) and wind speed (mean ρ = 0.639). Overall, positive correlations were observed between weekly dengue cases and rainfall for Selangor and Petaling across all time periods with significant correlations being observed for the period from 2011 to 2019 and 2015 to 2019. In addition, positive significant correlations were also observed between weekly dengue cases and temperature for Kelantan and Kota Baharu across all time periods, while negative significant correlations between weekly dengue cases and temperature were observed in Selangor and Petaling across all time periods. Overall negative correlations were observed between weekly dengue cases and wind speed in all areas from 2011 to 2019 and 2015 to 2019, with significant correlations being observed for the period from 2015 to 2019. EO-derived meteorological variables explained 48.2% of the variation in dengue cases in Selangor. Moderate to strong correlations were observed between meteorological variables recorded from EO data derived from satellites and ground stations, thereby justifying the use of EO data as a viable alternative to ground stations for recording meteorological variables. Both rainfall and temperature were found to be positively correlated with weekly dengue cases; however, wind speed was negatively correlated with dengue cases. View Full-Text
Keywords: dengue; rainfall; temperature; wind speed; earth observation dengue; rainfall; temperature; wind speed; earth observation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Singh, S.; Herng, L.C.; Sulaiman, L.H.; Wong, S.F.; Jelip, J.; Mokhtar, N.; Harpham, Q.; Tsarouchi, G.; Gill, B.S. The Effects of Meteorological Factors on Dengue Cases in Malaysia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6449. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116449

AMA Style

Singh S, Herng LC, Sulaiman LH, Wong SF, Jelip J, Mokhtar N, Harpham Q, Tsarouchi G, Gill BS. The Effects of Meteorological Factors on Dengue Cases in Malaysia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(11):6449. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116449

Chicago/Turabian Style

Singh, Sarbhan, Lai Chee Herng, Lokman Hakim Sulaiman, Shew Fung Wong, Jenarun Jelip, Norhayati Mokhtar, Quillon Harpham, Gina Tsarouchi, and Balvinder Singh Gill. 2022. "The Effects of Meteorological Factors on Dengue Cases in Malaysia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 11: 6449. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116449

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop