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Article

Living Well as a Muslim through the Pandemic Era—A Qualitative Study in Japan

1
Department of Global Health Research, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
2
The Section of Global Health, Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
3
Department of Medical Quality and Safety Management, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Metropolitan University, Osaka 558-8585, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Takahiro Tabuchi, Naoki Kondo and Kota Katanoda
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6020; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106020
Received: 12 April 2022 / Revised: 10 May 2022 / Accepted: 12 May 2022 / Published: 15 May 2022
This study explored the living situations, financial conditions, religious obligations, and social distancing of Muslims during the COVID-19 pandemic. In total, 28 Muslim community members living in the Kanto region were recruited; 18 of them were included in in-depth qualitative interviews and 10 in two focus group interviews. The snowball method was used, and the questionnaires were divided into four themes. The audio/video interviews were conducted via Zoom, and NAVIO was used to analyse the data thematically. The major Muslim events were cancelled, and the recommended physical distancing was maintained even during the prayers at home and in the mosques. The Japanese government’s financial support to each person was a beneficial step towards social protection, which was highlighted and praised by every single participant. Regardless of religious obligations, the closing of all major mosques in Tokyo demonstrates to the Japanese community how Muslims are serious about adhering to the public health guidelines during the pandemic. This study highlights that the pandemic has affected the religious patterns and behaviour of Muslims from inclusive to exclusive in a community, and recounts the significance of religious commitments. View Full-Text
Keywords: migrants; Islam; COVID-19 pandemic; public health migrants; Islam; COVID-19 pandemic; public health
MDPI and ACS Style

Ahmad, I.; Masuda, G.; Tomohiko, S.; Shabbir, C.A. Living Well as a Muslim through the Pandemic Era—A Qualitative Study in Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6020. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106020

AMA Style

Ahmad I, Masuda G, Tomohiko S, Shabbir CA. Living Well as a Muslim through the Pandemic Era—A Qualitative Study in Japan. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(10):6020. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106020

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ahmad, Ishtiaq, Gaku Masuda, Sugishita Tomohiko, and Chaudhry A. Shabbir. 2022. "Living Well as a Muslim through the Pandemic Era—A Qualitative Study in Japan" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 10: 6020. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106020

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