Next Article in Journal
Emergency Medical Services Calls Analysis for Trend Prediction during Epidemic Outbreaks: Interrupted Time Series Analysis on 2020–2021 COVID-19 Epidemic in Lazio, Italy
Previous Article in Journal
A Path Model of the Relationship between Mood, Exercise Behavior, Coping, and Mental Health among Malaysians during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Article

Transition from Nurses to Medicalized Elderly Caregivers: Comparison on Willingness between Traditional and Modern Regions in China

by 1,2,†, 1,2,†, 1,2, 3,* and 1,2,*
1
Department of Pharmacoeconomics, School of International Pharmaceutical Business, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 211198, China
2
Center for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 211198, China
3
Department of Hospital Group Office, Shenzhen Luohu Hospital Group, Shenzhen 518005, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Carmen María Sarabia-Cobo and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5950; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105950
Received: 7 April 2022 / Revised: 9 May 2022 / Accepted: 11 May 2022 / Published: 13 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research in Geriatric and Gerontological Nursing)
As China is transitioning to an aging society, the Chinese government has proposed an eldercare pattern, called medicalized elderly care, to help solve the rapid aging and health care problems together. However, the shortage of elderly caregivers is a critical issue, with deficiency both in quantity and quality. This study aims to survey nurses’ willingness to transition into medicalized elderly caregivers and compare it between modern and traditional regions. Nurses working in Guangdong (modern region) and Jilin (traditional region) were investigated using a self-administered questionnaire in October 2021. We analyzed the influencing factors through χ²-test, t-test a and binary logistic regression model and further explored the influence of region using propensity score matching (PSM). A total of 1227 nurses were included, with 726 (59.2%) of them showing willingness to transition. Nurses from traditional regions showed a significantly higher willingness to transition after PSM (p = 0.027). Other factors influencing nurses’ willingness were age, education, lived with older adults, participated in voluntary activities related to older adults, visited eldercare institutions, attitudes toward older adults, knowledge about older adults, hospice care attitudes and death attitudes. The willingness of nurses to transition was not high enough. To have more willing and skillful human resources for eldercare, we need a more “intimate society for older adults” in the first place. View Full-Text
Keywords: nurses; medicalized elder caregivers; transition willingness; influencing factors; China nurses; medicalized elder caregivers; transition willingness; influencing factors; China
MDPI and ACS Style

Gao, W.; Li, S.; Chi, Z.; Gong, F.; Tang, W. Transition from Nurses to Medicalized Elderly Caregivers: Comparison on Willingness between Traditional and Modern Regions in China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5950. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105950

AMA Style

Gao W, Li S, Chi Z, Gong F, Tang W. Transition from Nurses to Medicalized Elderly Caregivers: Comparison on Willingness between Traditional and Modern Regions in China. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(10):5950. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105950

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gao, Wenqing, Shuailong Li, Zhuoyuan Chi, Fangfang Gong, and Wenxi Tang. 2022. "Transition from Nurses to Medicalized Elderly Caregivers: Comparison on Willingness between Traditional and Modern Regions in China" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 10: 5950. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105950

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop