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Open AccessArticle

Associations of Social Cohesion and Socioeconomic Status with Health Behaviours among Middle-Aged and Older Chinese People

1
Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2
Shanghai Health Development Research Center (Shanghai Medical Information Center), Shanghai 200031, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emily A. Schmied
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4894; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094894
Received: 24 March 2021 / Revised: 27 April 2021 / Accepted: 2 May 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion and Behavioral Epidemiology)
Background: An understanding of factors associated with health behaviours is critical for the design of appropriate health promotion programmes. Important influences of social cohesion, education, and income on people’s health behaviours have been recognised in Western countries. However, little is known about these influences in the older Chinese population. Objective: To investigate associations of social cohesion and socioeconomic status (SES) with health behaviours among middle-aged and older adults in China. Methods: We used data from the World Health Organization’s Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health. Logistic regression and multivariate linear regression were performed. Results: Participants who reported greater social cohesion were more likely to have adequate vegetable and fruit (VF) consumption, be socially active, and less likely to smoke daily, but were not physically more active; participants with lower education levels were less likely to have adequate VF consumption and be socially active, and more likely to smoke daily; higher incomes were associated with decreased odds of daily smoking, increased odds of adequate VF consumption, increased likelihood to be socially active, but also less likelihood to have sufficient physical activity (PA). Associations of social cohesion and SES with health behaviours (smoking, PA, and VF consumption) differed between men and women. Discussion: Our findings are an essential step toward a fuller understanding of the roles of social cohesion and SES in protecting healthy behaviours among older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: social cohesion; socioeconomic status; physical activity; healthy diet; smoking; social participation; health behaviour social cohesion; socioeconomic status; physical activity; healthy diet; smoking; social participation; health behaviour
MDPI and ACS Style

Feng, Z.; Cramm, J.M.; Nieboer, A.P. Associations of Social Cohesion and Socioeconomic Status with Health Behaviours among Middle-Aged and Older Chinese People. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094894

AMA Style

Feng Z, Cramm JM, Nieboer AP. Associations of Social Cohesion and Socioeconomic Status with Health Behaviours among Middle-Aged and Older Chinese People. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Feng, Zeyun; Cramm, Jane M.; Nieboer, Anna P. 2021. "Associations of Social Cohesion and Socioeconomic Status with Health Behaviours among Middle-Aged and Older Chinese People" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 9: 4894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094894

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