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Article

Food Insecurity and Dietary Intake among Rural Indian Women: An Exploratory Study

1
The School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
2
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
3
Chitkara School of Health Sciences, Chitkara University, Punjab 144417, India
4
Centre of Water Sciences, Chitkara University Institute of Engineering and Technology, Chitkara University, Punjab 144417, India
5
Chitkara Business School, Chitkara University, Punjab 144417, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jon Øyvind Odland and David Rodríguez-Lázaro
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4851; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094851
Received: 10 March 2021 / Revised: 20 April 2021 / Accepted: 28 April 2021 / Published: 1 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Food Security and Public Health)
Food insecurity is an important contributor to health and a factor in both underweight and malnutrition, and overweight and obesity. Countries where both undernutrition and overweight and obesity coexist are said to be experiencing a double burden of malnutrition. India is one example of a country experiencing this double burden. Women have been found to experience the negative impacts of food insecurity and obesity, however, the reasons that women experience the impact of malnutrition more so than men are complex and are under-researched. This current research employed a mixed methods approach to begin to fill this gap by exploring the dietary intake, anthropometric characteristics, and food security status of rural Indian women. In total, 78 household were surveyed. The average waist measurement, waist to hip ratio, and BMI were all above WHO recommendations, with two thirds of participants categorized as obese. Contributing to these findings was a very limited diet, high in energy, and low in protein and iron. The findings of this research suggest that the rural Indian women in this study have a lack of diet diversity and may be at risk of a range of non-communicable diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: food security; India; women; rural food security; India; women; rural
MDPI and ACS Style

Sims, A.; van der Pligt, P.; John, P.; Kaushal, J.; Kaur, G.; McKay, F.H. Food Insecurity and Dietary Intake among Rural Indian Women: An Exploratory Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4851. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094851

AMA Style

Sims A, van der Pligt P, John P, Kaushal J, Kaur G, McKay FH. Food Insecurity and Dietary Intake among Rural Indian Women: An Exploratory Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4851. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094851

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sims, Alice, Paige van der Pligt, Preethi John, Jyotsna Kaushal, Gaganjot Kaur, and Fiona H McKay. 2021. "Food Insecurity and Dietary Intake among Rural Indian Women: An Exploratory Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 9: 4851. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094851

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