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Making Decision-Making Visible—Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions

1
Occupational Therapy Program, Department of Health Professions, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI 54601, USA
2
Entry-Level Doctor of Occupational Therapy, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA 97149, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: David Putrino, Mar Cortes and Joseph E. Herrera
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3635; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073635
Received: 6 February 2021 / Revised: 6 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 31 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Technologies and Applications in Rehabilitation Medicine)
Significant efforts in the past decades to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation has emphasized increasing knowledge of EBP and developing interventions to support adoption to practice. These efforts have resulted in only limited sustained improvements in the daily use of evidence-based interventions in clinical practice in most health professions. Many new interventions with limited evidence of effectiveness are readily adopted each year—indicating openness to change is not the problem. The selection of an intervention is the outcome of an elaborate and complex cognitive process, which is shaped by how they represent the problem in their mind and is mostly invisible processes to others. Therefore, the complex thinking process that support appropriate adoption of interventions should be taught more explicitly. Making the process visible to clinicians increases the acquisition of the skills required to judiciously select one intervention over others. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the selection process and the critical analysis that is required to appropriately decide to trial or not trial new intervention strategies with patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: evidence-based practice; clinical reasoning; causal model; intervention theory; concept mapping evidence-based practice; clinical reasoning; causal model; intervention theory; concept mapping
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MDPI and ACS Style

Benfield, A.; Krueger, R.B. Making Decision-Making Visible—Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3635. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073635

AMA Style

Benfield A, Krueger RB. Making Decision-Making Visible—Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3635. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073635

Chicago/Turabian Style

Benfield, Angela, and Robert B. Krueger 2021. "Making Decision-Making Visible—Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3635. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073635

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