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Article

Environmental Hazards and Behavior Change: User Perspectives on the Usability and Effectiveness of the AirRater Smartphone App

1
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Australia
2
Mary McKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne 3065, Australia
3
Public Health Services, Department of Health, Hobart 7000, Australia
4
School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Australia
5
School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Chunrong Jia and Tareq Hussein
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3591; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073591
Received: 17 February 2021 / Revised: 25 March 2021 / Accepted: 26 March 2021 / Published: 30 March 2021
AirRater is a free smartphone app developed in 2015, supporting individuals to protect their health from environmental hazards. It does this by providing (i) location-specific and near real-time air quality, pollen and temperature information and (ii) personal symptom tracking functionality. This research sought to evaluate user perceptions of AirRater’s usability and effectiveness. We collected demographic data and completed semi-structured interviews with 42 AirRater users, identified emergent themes, and used two frameworks designed to understand and support behavior change—the Behavior Change Wheel (BCW) and the Protective Action Decision Model (PADM)—to interpret results. Of the 42 participants, almost half indicated that experiencing symptoms acted as a prompt for app use. Information provided by the app supported a majority of the 42 participants to make decisions and implement behaviors to protect their health irrespective of their location or context. The majority of participants also indicated that they shared information provided by the app with family, friends and/or colleagues. The evaluation also identified opportunities to improve the app. Several study limitations were identified, which impacts the generalizability of results beyond the populations studied. Despite these limitations, findings facilitated new insights into motivations for behavior change, and contribute to the existing literature investigating the potential for smartphone apps to support health protection from environmental hazards in a changing climate. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; pollen; smartphone app; health; behavior change air pollution; pollen; smartphone app; health; behavior change
MDPI and ACS Style

Workman, A.; Jones, P.J.; Wheeler, A.J.; Campbell, S.L.; Williamson, G.J.; Lucani, C.; Bowman, D.M.J.S.; Cooling, N.; Johnston, F.H. Environmental Hazards and Behavior Change: User Perspectives on the Usability and Effectiveness of the AirRater Smartphone App. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3591. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073591

AMA Style

Workman A, Jones PJ, Wheeler AJ, Campbell SL, Williamson GJ, Lucani C, Bowman DMJS, Cooling N, Johnston FH. Environmental Hazards and Behavior Change: User Perspectives on the Usability and Effectiveness of the AirRater Smartphone App. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3591. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073591

Chicago/Turabian Style

Workman, Annabelle, Penelope J. Jones, Amanda J. Wheeler, Sharon L. Campbell, Grant J. Williamson, Chris Lucani, David M.J.S. Bowman, Nick Cooling, and Fay H. Johnston 2021. "Environmental Hazards and Behavior Change: User Perspectives on the Usability and Effectiveness of the AirRater Smartphone App" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3591. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073591

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