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Review

Impact and Effectiveness of Group Strategies for Supporting Breastfeeding after Birth: A Systematic Review

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Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Red Cross Nursing University Centre, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
2
Nursing Department, Faculty of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
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Surgery Department, Medical School, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
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Foetal Medicine Unit, Virgen Macarena University Hospital, 41009 Seville, Spain
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COIDESO Research Center, Nursing Department, University of Huelva, 21071 Huelva, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Amanda Rodrigues Amorim Adegboye
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2550; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052550
Received: 7 January 2021 / Revised: 25 February 2021 / Accepted: 28 February 2021 / Published: 4 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Child Health)
Despite the multiple benefits of breastfeeding both for the mother and for the infant, during the first months there is a progressive decline in the number of mothers who continue breastfeeding, with most countries reporting lower than recommended figures. The objective of this review is to analyse the most effective group support practices for breastfeeding, as well as the characteristics associated to their success in maintaining breastfeeding. A systematic review has been conducted in the 2015–2020 period, in the following databases: MedLine, Scopus, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library and LILACS. The findings were summarized in narrative and table formats. A total of thirteen articles were included, eight of them being experimental studies and five observational. The findings show high heterogeneity regarding the characteristics of the interventions and their periodicity. The most successful group strategies to support and maintain breastfeeding during postpartum are those that combine peer support with the leadership or counselling of a health professional or IBCLC. However, more studies are necessary, randomized and with interventions of similar characteristics, which allow for better data comparison. View Full-Text
Keywords: breastfeeding; lactation; self-help group; support group breastfeeding; lactation; self-help group; support group
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rodríguez-Gallego, I.; Leon-Larios, F.; Corrales-Gutierrez, I.; González-Sanz, J.D. Impact and Effectiveness of Group Strategies for Supporting Breastfeeding after Birth: A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2550. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052550

AMA Style

Rodríguez-Gallego I, Leon-Larios F, Corrales-Gutierrez I, González-Sanz JD. Impact and Effectiveness of Group Strategies for Supporting Breastfeeding after Birth: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(5):2550. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052550

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rodríguez-Gallego, Isabel, Fatima Leon-Larios, Isabel Corrales-Gutierrez, and Juan D. González-Sanz. 2021. "Impact and Effectiveness of Group Strategies for Supporting Breastfeeding after Birth: A Systematic Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 5: 2550. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052550

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