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Article

Self-Reported Waiting Times for Outpatient Health Care Services in Hungary: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey on a National Representative Sample

1
Department of Health Economics, Corvinus University of Budapest, Fővám tér 8, H-1093 Budapest, Hungary
2
Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Health Economics Research Center, University Research and Innovation Center, Óbuda University, Bécsi út 96/B, H-1034 Budapest, Hungary
4
Corvinus Institute for Advanced Studies, Corvinus University of Budapest, Fővám tér 8, H-1093 Budapest, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2213; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052213
Received: 1 February 2021 / Revised: 17 February 2021 / Accepted: 19 February 2021 / Published: 24 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inequalities in Health Care)
(1) Background: System-level data on waiting time in the outpatient setting in Hungary is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore self-reported waiting time for an appointment and at a doctor’s office. (2) Methods: An online, cross-sectional, self-administered survey was carried out in 2019 in Hungary among a representative sample (n = 1000) of the general adult population. Chi-squared test and logistic regression analysis were carried out to explore if socioeconomic characteristics, health status, or residence were associated with waiting times and the perception of waiting time as a problem. (3) Results: Proportions of 90%, 41%, and 64% of respondents were seen within a week by family doctor, public specialist, and private specialist, respectively. One-third of respondents waited more than a month to get an appointment with a public specialist. Respondents in better health status reported shorter waiting times; those respondents were less likely to perceive a problem with: (1) waiting time to get an appointment (OR = 0.400) and (2) waiting time at a doctor’s office (OR = 0.519). (4) Conclusions: Longest waiting times were reported for public specialist visits, but waiting times were favorable for family doctors and private specialists. Further investigation is needed to better understand potential inequities affecting people in worse health status. View Full-Text
Keywords: waiting time; patient experiences; outpatient care; EQ-5D-5L; Hungary waiting time; patient experiences; outpatient care; EQ-5D-5L; Hungary
MDPI and ACS Style

Brito Fernandes, Ó.; Lucevic, A.; Péntek, M.; Kringos, D.; Klazinga, N.; Gulácsi, L.; Zrubka, Z.; Baji, P. Self-Reported Waiting Times for Outpatient Health Care Services in Hungary: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey on a National Representative Sample. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2213. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052213

AMA Style

Brito Fernandes Ó, Lucevic A, Péntek M, Kringos D, Klazinga N, Gulácsi L, Zrubka Z, Baji P. Self-Reported Waiting Times for Outpatient Health Care Services in Hungary: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey on a National Representative Sample. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(5):2213. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052213

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brito Fernandes, Óscar, Armin Lucevic, Márta Péntek, Dionne Kringos, Niek Klazinga, László Gulácsi, Zsombor Zrubka, and Petra Baji. 2021. "Self-Reported Waiting Times for Outpatient Health Care Services in Hungary: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey on a National Representative Sample" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 5: 2213. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052213

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