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Article

Bullying Victimization and Problem Video Gaming: The Mediating Role of Externalizing and Internalizing Problems

1
International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1Y2, Canada
2
Department of Psychology, The Montreal Children’s Hospital, Montreal, QC H4A 3J1, Canada
3
Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board of Wood County Ohio, Bowling Green, OH 43402, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1930; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041930
Received: 5 February 2021 / Revised: 14 February 2021 / Accepted: 15 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
Background: Adolescent victims of bullying are more likely to experience a range of mental health problems. Although research has investigated the relationship between bullying victimization and various addictive behaviors, the impact of bullying on problem video gaming (PVG) remains largely unexplored. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between bullying victimization and PVG as mediated by the presence of internalizing and externalizing problems. Methods: Survey responses were collected from 6353 high-school students aged 12 to 18. Measures include bullying victimization (physical, verbal, cyber and indirect), internalizing (e.g., anxious and depressive symptoms) and externalizing (e.g., aggressive and delinquent problems) problems, and PVG (measured by the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale–Short Form). Results: Mediation analyses indicated that the relationship between verbal bullying and PVG was completely mediated by the presence of internalizing and externalizing problems. The relationship between physical bullying and PVG was completely mediated by externalizing problems and the relationship between cyberbullying and PVG was completely mediated by internalizing problems. Lastly, the relationship between indirect bullying and PVG was partially mediated by externalizing and internalizing problems. Conclusions: Results suggest that different types of bullying victimization are differentially associated with PVG, with mental health symptoms significantly mediating this relationship. View Full-Text
Keywords: bullying victimization; cyberbullying; externalizing problems; gaming disorder; internalizing problems; problem video gaming bullying victimization; cyberbullying; externalizing problems; gaming disorder; internalizing problems; problem video gaming
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MDPI and ACS Style

Richard, J.; Marchica, L.; Ivoska, W.; Derevensky, J. Bullying Victimization and Problem Video Gaming: The Mediating Role of Externalizing and Internalizing Problems. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041930

AMA Style

Richard J, Marchica L, Ivoska W, Derevensky J. Bullying Victimization and Problem Video Gaming: The Mediating Role of Externalizing and Internalizing Problems. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041930

Chicago/Turabian Style

Richard, Jérémie, Loredana Marchica, William Ivoska, and Jeffrey Derevensky. 2021. "Bullying Victimization and Problem Video Gaming: The Mediating Role of Externalizing and Internalizing Problems" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041930

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