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Review

A Perspective of the Cumulative Risks from Climate Change on Mt. Everest: Findings from the 2019 Expedition

1
Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04463, USA
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Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA
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National Geographic Society, Washington, DC 02917, USA
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Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146, USA
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Virtual Wonders, LLC, Wisconsin, Delafield, WI 53018, USA
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School of Earth and Climate Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04463, USA
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International Marine Litter Research Unit, University of Plymouth, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK
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Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1928; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041928
Received: 9 January 2021 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Disaster Risk in a Changing World)
In 2019, the National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest expedition successfully retrieved the greatest diversity of scientific data ever from the mountain. The confluence of geologic, hydrologic, chemical and microbial hazards emergent as climate change increases glacier melt is significant. We review the findings of increased opportunity for landslides, water pollution, human waste contamination and earthquake events. Further monitoring and policy are needed to ensure the safety of residents, future climbers, and trekkers in the Mt. Everest watershed. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mt. Everest; risk; climate change; pollution Mt. Everest; risk; climate change; pollution
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MDPI and ACS Style

Miner, K.R.; Mayewski, P.A.; Hubbard, M.; Broad, K.; Clifford, H.; Napper, I.; Gajurel, A.; Jaskolski, C.; Li, W.; Potocki, M.; Priscu, J. A Perspective of the Cumulative Risks from Climate Change on Mt. Everest: Findings from the 2019 Expedition. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1928. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041928

AMA Style

Miner KR, Mayewski PA, Hubbard M, Broad K, Clifford H, Napper I, Gajurel A, Jaskolski C, Li W, Potocki M, Priscu J. A Perspective of the Cumulative Risks from Climate Change on Mt. Everest: Findings from the 2019 Expedition. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1928. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041928

Chicago/Turabian Style

Miner, Kimberley R.; Mayewski, Paul A.; Hubbard, Mary; Broad, Kenny; Clifford, Heather; Napper, Imogen; Gajurel, Ananta; Jaskolski, Corey; Li, Wei; Potocki, Mariusz; Priscu, John. 2021. "A Perspective of the Cumulative Risks from Climate Change on Mt. Everest: Findings from the 2019 Expedition" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 4: 1928. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041928

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