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Review

A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Health-Promoting Food Retail-Based Interventions

1
Deakin Health Economics, School of Health and Social Development, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217, Australia
2
Global Obesity Centre, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217, Australia
3
Wellbeing and Preventable Chronic Disease Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0811, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1356; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031356
Received: 15 January 2021 / Revised: 28 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 2 February 2021
Background: While the number of retail interventions with impacts on diet- and/or health-related outcomes is increasing, the economic evaluation literature is limited. This review investigated (i) the cost-effectiveness of health-promoting food retail interventions and (ii) key assumptions adopted in these evaluations. Methods: A systematic review of published academic studies was undertaken (CRD42020153763). Fourteen databases were searched. Eligible studies were identified, analysed, and reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Results: Eight studies that evaluated 30 retail interventions were included in the review. Common outcomes reported were cost per healthy food item purchased/served or cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. Four studies undertook cost-utility analyses and half of these studies concluded that retail interventions were cost-effective in improving health outcomes. Most studies did not state any assumptions regarding compensatory behaviour (i.e., purchases/consumption of non-intervention foods or food purchases/consumption from non-intervention settings) and presumed that sales data were indicative of consumption. Conclusion: The cost-effectiveness of retail-based health-promoting interventions is inconclusive. Future health-promoting retail interventions should regularly include an economic evaluation which addresses key assumptions related to compensatory behaviour and the use of sales data as a proxy for consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: food retail intervention; economic evaluation; healthy diet; obesity prevention food retail intervention; economic evaluation; healthy diet; obesity prevention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tran, H.N.Q.; McMahon, E.; Moodie, M.; Ananthapavan, J. A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Health-Promoting Food Retail-Based Interventions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1356. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031356

AMA Style

Tran HNQ, McMahon E, Moodie M, Ananthapavan J. A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Health-Promoting Food Retail-Based Interventions. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1356. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031356

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tran, Huong N.Q., Emma McMahon, Marj Moodie, and Jaithri Ananthapavan. 2021. "A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Health-Promoting Food Retail-Based Interventions" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1356. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031356

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