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Article

Young Adults View Smartphone Tracking Technologies for COVID-19 as Acceptable: The Case of Taiwan

1
School of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
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Department of Psychology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
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Institute of Allied Health Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
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Department of Public Health, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
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Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung 114, Taiwan
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School of Psychology, The University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
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Unforgettable Research Services, Melbourne 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1332; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031332
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 22 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 2 February 2021
Taiwan has been successful in controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, without a vaccine the threat of a second outbreak remains. Young adults who show few to no symptoms when infected have been identified in many countries as driving the virus’ spread through unidentifiable community transmission. Mobile tracking technologies register nearby contacts of a user and notifies them if one later tests positive to the virus, potentially solving this issue; however, the effectiveness of these technologies depends on their acceptance by the public. The current study assessed attitudes towards three tracking technologies (telecommunication network tracking, a government app, and Apple and Google’s Bluetooth exposure notification system) among four samples of young Taiwanese adults (aged 25 years or younger). Using Bayesian methods, we find high acceptance for all three tracking technologies (>75%), with acceptance for each technology surpassing 90% if additional privacy measures were included. We consider the policy implications of these results for Taiwan and similar cultures. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; tracking technologies; SARS-CoV-2; contact tracing; Taiwan; public health; health policy; privacy; privacy calculus COVID-19; tracking technologies; SARS-CoV-2; contact tracing; Taiwan; public health; health policy; privacy; privacy calculus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Garrett, P.M.; Wang, Y.; White, J.P.; Hsieh, S.; Strong, C.; Lee, Y.-C.; Lewandowsky, S.; Dennis, S.; Yang, C.-T. Young Adults View Smartphone Tracking Technologies for COVID-19 as Acceptable: The Case of Taiwan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1332. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031332

AMA Style

Garrett PM, Wang Y, White JP, Hsieh S, Strong C, Lee Y-C, Lewandowsky S, Dennis S, Yang C-T. Young Adults View Smartphone Tracking Technologies for COVID-19 as Acceptable: The Case of Taiwan. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1332. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031332

Chicago/Turabian Style

Garrett, Paul M., YuWen Wang, Joshua P. White, Shulan Hsieh, Carol Strong, Yi-Chan Lee, Stephan Lewandowsky, Simon Dennis, and Cheng-Ta Yang. 2021. "Young Adults View Smartphone Tracking Technologies for COVID-19 as Acceptable: The Case of Taiwan" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1332. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031332

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