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A Proposed Theoretical Model for Sustainable and Safe Commensality among Older Adults

Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, 751 22 Uppsala, Sweden
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031172
Received: 17 December 2020 / Revised: 25 January 2021 / Accepted: 26 January 2021 / Published: 28 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Food, Nutrition and Health with Focus on Eating Together)
Eating together at the same table, i.e., commensality, is an old phenomenon among humans. Today, there is a relatively high number of people living in single households eating most meals on their own. Among adults aged 65+ years, both malnutrition and non-communicable diseases are common. These circumstances, as well as foodborne illnesses, cause health problems for the individual, as well as high societal costs. In older adults, several external factors might impact on commensality, such as living arrangements, health status, and cooking competence. Improved knowledge regarding healthy eating and food handling may improve attitudes and behaviors in relation to food safety and dietary intake. Further, commensality has been shown to influence dietary intake in multiple ways. Community-organized activities, e.g., Food Classes for Older Adults (FCOA), may lead to sustainable commensality. Participating in health-promoting activities can contribute to improved health outcomes and improved social interaction among older adults. The objective of this study was to propose a theoretical model to inspire and create networks for sustainable commensality among older adults. The model could serve as a conceptual framework when implementing FCOA in communities and research. Outcomes could be measured by investigating the frequency of commensality, health effects, and well-being. View Full-Text
Keywords: older adults; food classes; food safety; food safety trust; organized networking; sustainable commensality older adults; food classes; food safety; food safety trust; organized networking; sustainable commensality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marklinder, I.; Nydahl, M. A Proposed Theoretical Model for Sustainable and Safe Commensality among Older Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1172. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031172

AMA Style

Marklinder I, Nydahl M. A Proposed Theoretical Model for Sustainable and Safe Commensality among Older Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1172. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031172

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marklinder, Ingela, and Margaretha Nydahl. 2021. "A Proposed Theoretical Model for Sustainable and Safe Commensality among Older Adults" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1172. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031172

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