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Article

A Nurse-Led Education Program for Pneumoconiosis Caregivers at the Community Level

1
School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Yuk Choi Road, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
2
Pneumoconiosis Mutual Aid Fund, Sham Shui Po, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
3
Hong Kong Buddhist Hospital, Hong Kong, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Retired Nurse, General Manager (Nursing).
Academic Editor: Darcy McMaughan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1092; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031092
Received: 31 October 2020 / Revised: 11 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 26 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Disease, Disability, and Community Care)
Pneumoconiosis is an irreversible chronic disease. With functional limitations and an inability to work, pneumoconiosis patients require support from family caregivers. However, the needs of pneumoconiosis caregivers have been neglected. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-led education program, which involved four weekly 90-min workshops led by an experienced nurse and guided by Orem’s self-care deficit theory. A single-group, repeated-measure study design was adopted. Caregivers’ mental health (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS, four single items for stress, worriedness, tiredness, and insufficient support), caregiving burdens (caregiving burden scale, CBS), and unmet direct support and enabling needs (Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool, CSNAT) were measured at the baseline (T0), immediately after (T1), and one month after intervention (T2); 49, 41, and 28 female participants completed the T0, T1, and T2 measurements. Mean age was 65.9 years old (SD 10.08) with a range between 37 and 85 years old. The program improved the caregivers’ mental wellbeing, and reduced their caregiving burdens and their unmet support and enabling needs, both immediately (T1) and one-month after the intervention (T2). In particular, the intervention improved the caregivers’ mental wellbeing significantly, specifically depression symptoms, stress, and tiredness immediately after the intervention; and reduced most of their unmet support needs and unmet enabling needs one-month after the intervention. This was the first nurse-led program for pneumoconiosis caregivers and should serve as a foundation for further studies to test the program with robust designs. View Full-Text
Keywords: caregivers; learning domains; mental wellbeing; nurse-led program; Orem’s self-care deficit theory caregivers; learning domains; mental wellbeing; nurse-led program; Orem’s self-care deficit theory
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kin, C.; Tsang, C.Y.J.; Zhang, L.W.; Chan, S.K.Y. A Nurse-Led Education Program for Pneumoconiosis Caregivers at the Community Level. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1092. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031092

AMA Style

Kin C, Tsang CYJ, Zhang LW, Chan SKY. A Nurse-Led Education Program for Pneumoconiosis Caregivers at the Community Level. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1092. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031092

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kin, Cheung, Chun Yuk Jason Tsang, Lillian Weiwei Zhang, and Sandy Kit Ying Chan. 2021. "A Nurse-Led Education Program for Pneumoconiosis Caregivers at the Community Level" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1092. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031092

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