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Article

Improving Uptake and Sustainability of Sanitation Interventions in Timor-Leste: A Case Study

1
Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
2
Research School of Population Health, College of Health & Medicine, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
3
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, John Mathews Building, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Tiwi, NT 0810, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Joint first authors.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1013; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031013
Received: 27 November 2020 / Revised: 13 January 2021 / Accepted: 14 January 2021 / Published: 24 January 2021
Open defecation (OD) is still a significant public health challenge worldwide. In Timor-Leste, where an estimated 20% of the population practiced OD in 2017, increasing access and use of improved sanitation facilities is a government priority. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) has become a popular strategy to end OD since its inception in 2000, but evidence on the uptake of CLTS and related interventions and the long-term sustainability of OD-free (ODF) communities is limited. This study utilized a mixed-methods approach, encompassing quantitative monitoring and evaluation data from water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) agencies, and semi-structured interviews with staff working for these organizations and the government Department of Environmental Health, to examine sanitation interventions in Timor-Leste. Recommendations from WASH practitioners on how sanitation strategies can be optimized to ensure ODF sustainability are presented. Whilst uptake of interventions is generally good in Timor-Leste, lack of consistent monitoring and evaluation following intervention delivery may contribute to the observed slippage back to OD practices. Stakeholder views suggest that long-term support and monitoring after ODF certification are needed to sustain ODF communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: sanitation; WASH; CLTS; ODF; subsidies; Timor-Leste sanitation; WASH; CLTS; ODF; subsidies; Timor-Leste
MDPI and ACS Style

Clarke, N.E.; Dyer, C.E.F.; Amaral, S.; Tan, G.; Vaz Nery, S. Improving Uptake and Sustainability of Sanitation Interventions in Timor-Leste: A Case Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1013. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031013

AMA Style

Clarke NE, Dyer CEF, Amaral S, Tan G, Vaz Nery S. Improving Uptake and Sustainability of Sanitation Interventions in Timor-Leste: A Case Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1013. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031013

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clarke, Naomi E., Clare E.F. Dyer, Salvador Amaral, Garyn Tan, and Susana Vaz Nery. 2021. "Improving Uptake and Sustainability of Sanitation Interventions in Timor-Leste: A Case Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1013. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031013

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