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Article

Why Do Public Safety Personnel Seek Tailored Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy? An Observational Study of Treatment-Seekers

1
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Pkwy, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
2
PSPNET, University of Regina, 2 Research Drive, Regina, SK S4T 2P7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 11972; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211972
Received: 19 October 2021 / Revised: 10 November 2021 / Accepted: 13 November 2021 / Published: 15 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Safety Personnel: Mental Health and Well-Being)
First responders and other public safety personnel (PSP) experience elevated rates of mental disorders and face unique barriers to care. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) is an effective and accessible treatment that has demonstrated good treatment outcomes when tailored specifically for PSP. However, little is known about how PSP come to seek ICBT. A deeper understanding of why PSP seek ICBT can inform efforts to tailor and disseminate ICBT and other treatments to PSP. The present study was designed to (1) explore the demographic and clinical characteristics, motivations, and past treatments of PSP seeking ICBT, (2) learn how PSP first learned about ICBT, and (3) understand how PSP perceive ICBT. To address these objectives, we examined responses to online screening questionnaires among PSP (N = 259) who signed up for an ICBT program tailored for PSP. The results indicate that most of our sample experienced clinically significant symptoms of multiple mental disorders, had received prior mental disorder diagnoses and treatments, heard about ICBT from a work-related source, reported positive perceptions of ICBT, and sought ICBT to learn skills to manage their own symptoms of mental disorders. The insights gleaned through this study have important implications for ICBT researchers and others involved in the development, delivery, evaluation, and funding of mental healthcare services for PSP. View Full-Text
Keywords: internet; cognitive behavioural therapy; anxiety; depression; eHealth; public safety personnel internet; cognitive behavioural therapy; anxiety; depression; eHealth; public safety personnel
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MDPI and ACS Style

McCall, H.C.; Landry, C.A.; Ogunade, A.; Carleton, R.N.; Hadjistavropoulos, H.D. Why Do Public Safety Personnel Seek Tailored Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy? An Observational Study of Treatment-Seekers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11972. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211972

AMA Style

McCall HC, Landry CA, Ogunade A, Carleton RN, Hadjistavropoulos HD. Why Do Public Safety Personnel Seek Tailored Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy? An Observational Study of Treatment-Seekers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(22):11972. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211972

Chicago/Turabian Style

McCall, Hugh C., Caeleigh A. Landry, Adeyemi Ogunade, R. Nicholas Carleton, and Heather D. Hadjistavropoulos. 2021. "Why Do Public Safety Personnel Seek Tailored Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy? An Observational Study of Treatment-Seekers" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 22: 11972. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211972

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