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Article

Positive Self-Perceptions of Aging Play a Significant Role in Predicting Physical Performance among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

1
Department of Health, Education and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, SE 971 87 Luleå, Sweden
2
Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, SE 752 37 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eva Ekvall Hansson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11151; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111151
Received: 28 September 2021 / Revised: 19 October 2021 / Accepted: 20 October 2021 / Published: 23 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Movement Disorders and Falls in Older Persons)
Self-perceptions of aging (SPA) is associated with various health-related outcomes, including physical performance. No previous study has investigated the potential predictive influence of SPA on physical performance among Swedish community-dwelling older adults. This was a cross-sectional study using a random sample of 153 Swedish community-dwelling individuals aged 70 and older. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, using the subscale “Attitude Towards Own Aging” of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale, as a measure of SPA. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) was dichotomized and used as the outcome variable. SPA was a significant predictor (OR = 1.546, CI = 1.066–2.243) of physical performance, adjusted for age, cognitive function, and life-space mobility. Further analyses revealed significant sex differences, with SPA not being included in the model for the men whilst it was still a significant predictor (OR = 1.689, CI = 1.031–2.765) of physical performance in the group of women. SPA plays a significant role in predicting physical performance among Swedish community-dwelling older adults. To further clarify this relationship and its consequences, future longitudinal research should focus on the relationship between SPA, physical performance, and fall risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-perceptions of aging; physical functional performance; attitude toward own aging; ageism; falls; healthy aging self-perceptions of aging; physical functional performance; attitude toward own aging; ageism; falls; healthy aging
MDPI and ACS Style

Nilsson, E.; Igelström, H.; Vikman, I.; Larsson, A.; Pauelsen, M. Positive Self-Perceptions of Aging Play a Significant Role in Predicting Physical Performance among Community-Dwelling Older Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11151. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111151

AMA Style

Nilsson E, Igelström H, Vikman I, Larsson A, Pauelsen M. Positive Self-Perceptions of Aging Play a Significant Role in Predicting Physical Performance among Community-Dwelling Older Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11151. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111151

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nilsson, Emma, Helena Igelström, Irene Vikman, Agneta Larsson, and Mascha Pauelsen. 2021. "Positive Self-Perceptions of Aging Play a Significant Role in Predicting Physical Performance among Community-Dwelling Older Adults" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11151. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111151

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