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Article

Increased COVID-19 Testing Rates Following Combined Door-to-Door and Mobile Testing Facility Campaigns in Oslo, Norway, a Difference-in-Difference Analysis

1
Division for Health Services, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0213 Oslo, Norway
2
Centre for Epidemic Interventions Research, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0213 Oslo, Norway
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, 0130 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Rachael Dodd, Rae Thomas, Julie Ayre, Kristen Pickles and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11078; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111078
Received: 31 August 2021 / Revised: 15 October 2021 / Accepted: 19 October 2021 / Published: 21 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Behavioural Science during COVID-19)
High testing rates limit COVID-19 transmission. Attempting to increase testing rates, Stovner District in Oslo, Norway, combined door-to-door campaigns with easy access testing facilities. We studied the intervention’s impact on COVID-19 testing rates. The Stovner District administration executed three door-to-door campaigns promoting COVID-19 testing accompanied by drop-in mobile COVID-19 testing facilities in different areas at 2-week intervals. We calculated testing rates pre- and post-campaigns using data from the Norwegian emergency preparedness register for COVID-19 (Beredt C19). We applied a difference-in-difference approach using ordinary least square regression models and robust standard errors to estimate changes in COVID-19 testing rates. Door-to-door visits reached around one of three households. Intervention and comparison areas had identical testing rates before the intervention, and we observed an increase in intervention areas after the campaigns. We estimate a 43% increase in testing rates over the first three days following the door-to-door campaigns (p = 0.28), corresponding to an additional 79 (95% confidence interval, −54 to 175) people tested. Considering the shape of the time series curves and the large effect estimate, we find it highly likely that the campaigns had a substantial positive impact on COVID-19 testing rates, despite a p-value above the conventional levels for statistical significance. The results and the feasibility of the intervention suggest that it may be worth implementing in similar settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; humans; impact evaluation; non-pharmaceutical interventions; difference-in-difference COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; humans; impact evaluation; non-pharmaceutical interventions; difference-in-difference
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vinjerui, K.H.; Elgersma, I.H.; Fretheim, A. Increased COVID-19 Testing Rates Following Combined Door-to-Door and Mobile Testing Facility Campaigns in Oslo, Norway, a Difference-in-Difference Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11078. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111078

AMA Style

Vinjerui KH, Elgersma IH, Fretheim A. Increased COVID-19 Testing Rates Following Combined Door-to-Door and Mobile Testing Facility Campaigns in Oslo, Norway, a Difference-in-Difference Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11078. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111078

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vinjerui, Kristin H., Ingeborg H. Elgersma, and Atle Fretheim. 2021. "Increased COVID-19 Testing Rates Following Combined Door-to-Door and Mobile Testing Facility Campaigns in Oslo, Norway, a Difference-in-Difference Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11078. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111078

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