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Article

Longitudinal Impact of Depressive Symptoms and Peer Tobacco Use on the Number of Tobacco Products Used by Young Adults

Department of Kinesiology & Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Elizabeth G. Klein and Amanda Quisenberry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11077; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111077
Received: 2 September 2021 / Revised: 14 October 2021 / Accepted: 19 October 2021 / Published: 21 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Research in Regulatory Tobacco Science)
We examined the role of depressive symptoms in the longitudinal trajectory of the number of tobacco products used across young adulthood, ages 18–30 years, and whether peer tobacco use exacerbated the effects of the depressive symptoms. Participants were 4534 initially 18–25-year-old young adults in the Marketing and Promotions Across Colleges in Texas project (Project M-PACT), which collected data across a 4.5-year period from 2014 to 2019. Growth curve modeling within an accelerated design was used to test study hypotheses. Elevated depressive symptoms were associated with a greater number of tobacco products used concurrently and at least six months later. The number of tobacco-using peers moderated the association between depressive symptoms and the number of tobacco products trajectory. Young adults with elevated depressive symptoms used a greater number of tobacco products but only when they had a greater number of tobacco-using peers. Findings indicate that not all young adults with depressive symptoms use tobacco. Having a greater number of tobacco-using peers may facilitate a context that both models and encourages tobacco use. Therefore, tobacco prevention programs should aim to include peer components, especially for young adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: tobacco products; depression; peers; young adults; Texas; longitudinal tobacco products; depression; peers; young adults; Texas; longitudinal
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MDPI and ACS Style

North, C.; Marti, C.N.; Loukas, A. Longitudinal Impact of Depressive Symptoms and Peer Tobacco Use on the Number of Tobacco Products Used by Young Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11077. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111077

AMA Style

North C, Marti CN, Loukas A. Longitudinal Impact of Depressive Symptoms and Peer Tobacco Use on the Number of Tobacco Products Used by Young Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11077. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111077

Chicago/Turabian Style

North, Caroline, C. N. Marti, and Alexandra Loukas. 2021. "Longitudinal Impact of Depressive Symptoms and Peer Tobacco Use on the Number of Tobacco Products Used by Young Adults" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11077. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111077

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