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Urban Lighting Research Transdisciplinary Framework—A Collaborative Process with Lighting Professionals

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Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin, Germany
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Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, Institute of Biology, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin, Germany
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Faculty of Architecture and Design, Hochschule Wismar University of Applied Sciences Technology, Business and Design, 23966 Wismar, Germany
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GUT Light Lab, Faculty of Architecture, Gdansk University of Technology (GUT), 80-233 Gdansk, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020624
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 8 January 2021 / Accepted: 8 January 2021 / Published: 13 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution)
Over the past decades, lighting professionals have influenced the experience of the night by brightly illuminating streets, buildings, skylines, and landscapes 24/7. When this became the accepted norm, a dual perspective on night-time was shaped and the visual enjoyment of visitors after dusk was prioritized over natural nightscapes (nocturnal landscapes). During this time, researchers of artificial light at night (ALAN) observed and reported a gradual increase in unnatural brightness and a shift in color of the night-time environment. As a consequence, ALAN has been identified as a relevant pollutant of aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and an environmental stressor, which may adversely affect a wide range of organisms, from micro-organisms to humans. Unfortunately, lighting professionals and ALAN researchers usually attempt to solve today’s sustainable urban lighting problems distinctive to their fields of study, without a dialogue between research and practice. Therefore, in order to translate research knowledge as an applicable solution for the lighting practice and to minimize the impact on the environment, a collaborative framework involving a transdisciplinary process with lighting professionals is crucial to potentially bring the practice, research, production, decision-making, and planning closer to each other. This paper presents a framework to help reduce the existing gap of knowledge, because appropriate lighting applications depend upon it. Access to less light polluted nightscapes in urban environments is just as important as access to unpolluted water, food, and air. This call for action towards sustainable urban lighting should be included in future lighting policies to solve the urgent environmental and health challenges facing our world. View Full-Text
Keywords: light pollution; ecological light pollution; sustainable lighting; urban planning; lighting professionals; ALAN researchers; urban lighting research; transdisciplinary research light pollution; ecological light pollution; sustainable lighting; urban planning; lighting professionals; ALAN researchers; urban lighting research; transdisciplinary research
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pérez Vega, C.; Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Hölker, F. Urban Lighting Research Transdisciplinary Framework—A Collaborative Process with Lighting Professionals. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020624

AMA Style

Pérez Vega C, Zielinska-Dabkowska KM, Hölker F. Urban Lighting Research Transdisciplinary Framework—A Collaborative Process with Lighting Professionals. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(2):624. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pérez Vega, Catherine; Zielinska-Dabkowska, Karolina M.; Hölker, Franz. 2021. "Urban Lighting Research Transdisciplinary Framework—A Collaborative Process with Lighting Professionals" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 2: 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020624

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