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Article

Working Conditions Influencing Drivers’ Safety and Well-Being in the Transportation Industry: “On Board” Program

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Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of New England, Biddeford, ME 04005, USA
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Sociology Department, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1B 1T5, Canada
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Mutual de Seguridad CChC, Santiago 8320000, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sara L. Tamers, L. Casey Chosewood and Jessica Streit
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10173; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910173
Received: 10 August 2021 / Revised: 17 September 2021 / Accepted: 22 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Worker Safety, Health, and Well-Being in the USA)
The conditions of work for professional drivers can contribute to adverse health and well-being outcomes. Fatigue can result from irregular shift scheduling, stress may arise due to the intense job demands, back pain may be due to prolonged sitting and exposure to vibration, and a poor diet can be attributed to limited time for breaks and rest. This study aimed to identify working conditions and health outcomes in a bussing company by conducting focus groups and key informant interviews to inform a Total Worker Health® organizational intervention. Our thematic analysis identified three primary themes: lack of trust between drivers and supervisors, the scheduling of shifts and routes, and difficulty performing positive health behaviors. These findings demonstrate the value of using participatory methods with key stakeholders to determine the unique working conditions and pathways that may be most critical to impacting safety, health, and well-being in an organization. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthy work design and well-being; organizational design; healthy leadership; occupational stress; fatigue; bus driver; health promotion; Total Worker Health; focus groups; scheduling healthy work design and well-being; organizational design; healthy leadership; occupational stress; fatigue; bus driver; health promotion; Total Worker Health; focus groups; scheduling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Peters, S.E.; Grogan, H.; Henderson, G.M.; López Gómez, M.A.; Martínez Maldonado, M.; Silva Sanhueza, I.; Dennerlein, J.T. Working Conditions Influencing Drivers’ Safety and Well-Being in the Transportation Industry: “On Board” Program. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10173. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910173

AMA Style

Peters SE, Grogan H, Henderson GM, López Gómez MA, Martínez Maldonado M, Silva Sanhueza I, Dennerlein JT. Working Conditions Influencing Drivers’ Safety and Well-Being in the Transportation Industry: “On Board” Program. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(19):10173. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910173

Chicago/Turabian Style

Peters, Susan E., Harrison Grogan, Gesele M. Henderson, María Andrée López Gómez, Marta Martínez Maldonado, Iván Silva Sanhueza, and Jack T. Dennerlein. 2021. "Working Conditions Influencing Drivers’ Safety and Well-Being in the Transportation Industry: “On Board” Program" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 19: 10173. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910173

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