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Urban Nature and Public Health: How Nature Exposure and Sociocultural Background Relate to Depression Risk

Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University of Stuttgart, 70174 Stuttgart, Germany
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9689; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189689
Received: 9 August 2021 / Revised: 10 September 2021 / Accepted: 13 September 2021 / Published: 14 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
As the world’s population becomes more urbanized, there is an associated decrease in nature exposure and a rise in noncommunicable diseases, including depression. Previous cross-sectional studies examining urban nature exposure and depression have reported favorable associations. However, many of these studies rely primarily on nature exposure metrics that measure the intensity of nature exposure, while other dimensions of urban nature exposure remain understudied. Therefore, in a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based case study targeting a general urban population (n = 282), we examined the relationship between two less commonly studied urban nature exposure variables (i.e., gardening behavior and greenspace visit frequency) and depression risk while also considering sociocultural background (multivariate logistic regression model). Results indicated that being a gardener was significantly associated with a reduced odds of being at risk of depression and that having a family migration history, but not a self-migration history, was associated with increased odds of being at risk of depression. In the examination of neighborhood socialization frequency and depression risk, we did not determine any significant association. The results of this study, therefore, highlight the importance of considering both people’s sociocultural backgrounds and urban nature exposure in more detail to help plan for and support healthier cities in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health; public health; depression risk; urban nature exposure; urban gardening behavior; sociodemographic characteristics; immigration history mental health; public health; depression risk; urban nature exposure; urban gardening behavior; sociodemographic characteristics; immigration history
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jakstis, K.; Fischer, L.K. Urban Nature and Public Health: How Nature Exposure and Sociocultural Background Relate to Depression Risk. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9689. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189689

AMA Style

Jakstis K, Fischer LK. Urban Nature and Public Health: How Nature Exposure and Sociocultural Background Relate to Depression Risk. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(18):9689. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189689

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jakstis, Kristen, and Leonie K. Fischer 2021. "Urban Nature and Public Health: How Nature Exposure and Sociocultural Background Relate to Depression Risk" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 18: 9689. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189689

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